Enough’s as good as a feast

After last week’s indulgent  Chess Pie, ‘the cupboard was bare’; or so I thought.

But I was wrong.

Whilst there was no cake,

there was cobbler; a beautiful blueberry one.

Old fashioned Blueberry Cobbler

Old fashioned Blueberry Cobbler

And though no bread could be found, there were biscuits    scones; the rustic, girdle kind.

Rustic girdle scones

Rustic, girdle scones

So from no-thing much, I cobbled together more than enough,

and enough is as good as a feast.

Tuck in.

Enjoy. We did.

Thanks to Sheryl, from A Hundred Years Ago, for the old-fashioned cobbler recipe, and for reminding me of the versatility of a basic dough.

 

And who wants to lick the spoon clean?

Lick the spoon clean, please. Waste not, want not. :)

Lick the spoon clean, please. Waste not, want not. 🙂

© silkannthreades

 

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114 thoughts on “Enough’s as good as a feast

  1. Pingback: Something old, something new | silkannthreades

    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Yep, the spoon is all licked out. I will have to make more cobbler for you. After all, it was a bit naughty of me to send you out looking for a totem pole and then bake a feast whilst you were out…and not tell you what I was up to. 😉

      Reply
  2. Su Leslie

    These look wonderful; especially the cobbler. I’m teaching the boychild to cook from the ingredients we have, rather than those he sees in a recipe book – something his father hasn’t mastered. Essential for a young man who will fly away soon and have to take charge of his own eating – and his own budget!!!

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      That’s an excellent idea; to teach the boychild to cook with what is available/on hand. Did he have cooking/homeskills/home economics classes or options at school? Not sure if they are offered these days. I remember my son coming home from a school cooking class and teaching me how to make a fruit pizza. It was delicious.

      Reply
      1. Su Leslie

        Thanks. He hasn’t had any cooking lessons at school, but loves food and has been “cooking” with me since he was tiny. We used to bake ANZAC biscuits together when he was in pre-school, and he mastered salads in primary – mainly because he preferred his food raw! I think intermediates still do food tech, but the boy-child wasn’t in the state system and his school did something else instead. I’ve never had fruit pizza – because it’s usually on the menu in restaurants that also serve savory pizza and eating two flatbreads with toppings is a bit much. Like having Yorkshire pudding and clafoutis at the same meal!

        Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          Well, when the boy-child is on his own, he will have lots of people wanting to come to his dinner parties. 🙂 Yorkshire puddings and clafoutis….that made me laugh. I can’t imagine having that combination at the same meal.

        2. Su Leslie

          Yes, I imagine he will. My younger brother is a very good cook and has always used that to impress girlfriends. I think the boy-child is hoping for something similar!

  3. shoreacres

    Well! I went over to Sheryl’s to looks at the cobbler recipe, and got sidetracked by the cherry pudding recipe in her sidebar. I honestly think I haven’t been able to replicate my grandmother’s cobbler because it wasn’t at all a typical biscuit cobbler. Instead, it seems to have been more like the cherry pudding.

    We’ll find out soon enough, because in 20 minutes the version I did with fresh peaches will come out of the oven, and I can give it a try. Whether I can stand to let it cool a bit first is an open question. In any event, I’ll report, and I left a grateful note at Sheryl’s, too. I’ve been on the trail of the perfect cobbler so long — maybe I finally have found it!

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Please do tell if you have found the perfect recipe. I am very curious. I have seen several different cobbler recipes; they all look great, but what I liked about the biscuit/scone version was its ease and convenience and the simplicity of ingredients. The cherry pudding recipe on Sheryl’s site does look good. Perhaps that will be the next one I try.

      Reply
  4. Sheryl

    I’m glad you enjoyed the recipe. I’m going to have to try making the blueberry version of this recipe. You are an awesome food photographer. My food photography tends to be kind of hit or miss–and I wish that I could consistently get photo’s like you have in this post.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      It is a great recipe. And I was surprised my photos came out as well as they did. The light was poor but about 50% of the photos I took were fine. The biggest problem was restraining myself from eating everything before I could get the camera out!

      Reply
  5. tableofcolors

    Isn’t it a surprise what can be made with the simplest ingredients often forgotten in the back of the cupboard or freezer. Both the old-fashioned cobbler and scones looked perfectly wonderful!

    Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          That’s an excellent idea. Did you notice that my girdle scone recipe is so old that it pre-dates NZ’s change to the metric system?

  6. KerryCan

    A great example of “making do”! What scrumptious-looking treats! I suspect lots of readers will be buying berries for a cobbler after seeing your photos!

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      It is a ‘making do’, isn’t it? I had a big shop yesterday so I am all stocked up again. Hopefully I can make do for a good while now. I bought more frozen blueberries but, if it were a bit later in the year, I would be looking to see what I could harvest from the blueberry bush. 🙂

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Thank you Mary. The cobbler was as good as it looks but you may have a giggle over the burnt bits of crust that I managed to leave out of the photos. 😀

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      My old cookbook is a gem. The more messed up it gets, the more I love it. It’s probably only holding together because of all the sticky stuff that has been dripped on it over the years. 😀

      Reply
  7. coulda shoulda woulda

    I thought I already left a comment but it’s gone – happenign quite a bit lately…I was going to say I can’t believe that is what you make when the cupboards are empty! you are like mcguyver in the kitchen!

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Oh dear! Another of your comments directed to Spam. 😦 Sometimes, just sometimes, I like to see how long I can go before I have to go to the shops! Such are my small amusements/challenges. 😀 Also, when we lived overseas, we often couldn’t get ingredients I was used to, so I became quite inventive with what ever was available.

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Ooops…..sorry about that. Frozen blueberries were the only fruit I could find in my house, so blueberry cobbler it had to be. Well, I did have bananas but I don’t think they would work in a cobbler.

      Reply
  8. Tiny

    You are such a great baker! These look so good…now I need something to eat …just before midnight. Oh, I found an organic Fuji apple, but it would be much yummier in a warm cobbler with all the trimmings 🙂

    Reply
  9. Lavinia Ross

    There was a little bakery back east that made the best blueberry-oat scones. The scone photos reminded me of going out to breakfast there on the weekend. I have not found a scone anywhere like those since!

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Thanks Liz. That’s a lovely comment from a blogger who takes mouth-watering dishes to a whole new level.:) By the way, I made your polenta pancakes. Delicious, but mine turned out far too rustic for public display!

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I had to use frozen blueberries but they were fine as they were delicious, organic NZ ones. However to make a cobbler with fresh blueberries would be wonderful. The original recipe, from Sheryl, calls for black raspberries.

      Reply
  10. Letizia

    Oh everything looks so good! It’s been a while since I’ve eaten scones and clotted cream- how I love them.

    Can you teach me how to pronounce the word ‘scone’? I think I’ve been mispronouncing them for years. I wan to pronounce them like ‘tone’ but is it like ‘Ron’?

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      These were the first scones I had made in ages. How to pronounce scone? Mmmmm…I say scone as in Ron, as most people in NZ do. However, I suspect that is an antipodean pronunciation. Perhaps one of my Scottish/Celtic/British followers could help with this…please? 🙂

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      These scones and pikelets were perfect quick snacks, weren’t they? I do modify the scone recipe according to what I have available; oil for butter, buttermilk or yogurt for milk, some wholemeal flour or wheatgerm. I am glad you write griddle scones. I always say griddle but use the girdle spelling which my grandmother used.

      Reply
      1. thecontentedcrafter

        Good Morning! This is the second excellent link you have provided me with 🙂 Thank you very much – what an interesting young woman! I’ve followed so I can can keep an eye on her food 🙂

        Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          She is very interesting! I know we have people in NZ who write about food on a budget, but I am not sure we have anyone here who combines that skill with politics, or holding a Government to account for its social policies/the rising need for food banks.

  11. BEAUTYCALYPSE

    Mmmmh, a blueberry cobbler! Such a treat!!! Wait, I do have blueberries, and some gf bread… Tomorrow we’ll have blueberry cobbler for breakfast. Oh, I can’t wait! 😀

    Reply
  12. restlessjo

    Ann, you’re spoiling us! I’ve got the ‘girls’ coming to mine for supper on Friday. They would love this but I’m not so good at baking 🙂

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      You should play a little party trick on them. Bake the cobbler; show them the photos from the blog as they eat and they will be sure to say that your cobbler is delicious. It will be like augmented reality. 😉

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      It was. I am a big fan of blueberries but, in such quantities, they do leave me with an interesting blue tongue. I spared everyone a photo of that!

      Reply

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