Tag Archives: gluten-free

Rice Bread and Blossom

It seems that I am on an unstoppable bread (making ) roll…(eek, arrgh, squeak, sorry…. for a no good, horrible, very bad, but irresistible, pun 🙂 ), because, yesterday, I made some rice bread. I had some lonely, left- over cooked rice in the fridge, so I decided to use it in one my favourite recipes, Philpy, Hot Rice Bread. Philpy, is a quick (non yeast) bread which, apparently, has its origins in South Carolina.

Philpy (Hot Rice Bread)

Philpy (Hot Rice Bread)

I have been making versions of Philpy since 1987, which was the year I first discovered the recipe in American Harvest by Nava Atlas.

American Harvest by Nava Atlas

American Harvest by Nava Atlas

American Harvest, (Regional Recipes for the Vegetarian Kitchen) is a gem of a book, beautifully researched and illustrated. Every recipe comes with a small note on its history, as well as a delightful quote expertly, and often humorously, illustrated by the author. For example,  the quote for Philpy comes from Abe Martin’s Almanack, 1911, and goes like this “Q. My husband buys forty-five cents worth of mixed drinks every time I send him for a five-cent loaf of bread. How long will we keep our home? A. It takes longer to drink up some homes than it does others. Try baking your own bread. -Kin Hubbard.” Well, that may, or may not, be a helpful answer but baking your own  Philpy Hot Rice Bread is certainly a good idea. It’s easy and fun and it’s a great bread for a snack, or for breakfast, or lunch. And it goes well with lots of different toppings. Nava’s recipe is also a versatile one.  It  can be made gluten-free and dairy-free with ease. Yesterday, I made a gluten-free Philpy by using a combination of buckwheat flour and brown rice flour, instead of the usual whole wheat flour. I also whizzed  up the ingredients in the food processor, for the first time ever, and that gave my bread a very good texture. (Why has it taken me 26 years to work out that little trick????)

Come and sit with me, in the spring sunshine of Christchurch. Let  me offer you a warm slice of South Carolina Philby, spread with butter and sweet, young rhubarb compote. Sound good? It tastes good 🙂

Philpy for Tea

Philpy for Tea

Spring Blossom

Spring Blossom

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For those of you who would like to learn more about Nava Atlas, I would recommend a visit to her VegKitchen website which has links to her career as a writer and artist as well.http://www.vegkitchen.com/

And, as a little sampler of the way Nava brings joy to my baking through her art and wit and research, take a peek at my collage!

How to have fun with history, food and art

How to have fun with history, food and art

© silkannthreades

How did I do with my bread, Annie?

Some of my followers may recall that I love to make bread. I wrote about my enthusiasm for bread making Here  I haven’t made any bread for a while because I have been enjoying an upmarket-supermarket bread, made with Flax and Spelt. Yesterday, however, I was in exactly the right mood to make my own bread again, so, how timely was this post from Forest So Green http://forestsogreen.wordpress.com/2013/09/04/making-oatmeal-bread/  It’s a perfect, detailed, easy to follow recipe for making oatmeal bread.  I followed Annie’s instructions carefully; especially this very important one “While the bread is baking, it is going to smell very good.  Ignore your thoughts to open the oven door.  The bread is on its own now and it knows exactly what to do.   Just sit back, enjoy the delicious aroma, and wait for the kitchen timer to ring.”

Here is the result. How did I do Annie? The loaves aren’t as beautifully shaped as yours but they taste ever so good. Thank you for a wonderful recipe 🙂

Annie's Oatmeal Bread made by Gallivanta

Annie’s Oatmeal Bread made by Gallivanta

I know that many folk no longer eat wheat based breads because of gluten intolerance/allergies, so they won’t share my adoration of all things bread. But, for me, there is hardly anything more soothing and rewarding than the process of bread making, followed by that first bite, from that first slice, of fresh-from-the-oven bread.

© silkannthreades

 

In my night kitchen

I am causing mayhem in the kitchen again.

There’s mess and chaos, just as before, https://silkannthreades.wordpress.com/2013/08/05/kitchen-chaos/

but this time, I am cooking by the light of the moon…not really…..but there is a big, bold moon in the sky which I can see from my well-lit kitchen.

Here is what is happening:

There are cookies and crumbs

Chocolate Chip Cookies

Chocolate Chip Cookies

from  the excellent The Sensitive Gourmet, Antoinette Savill, http://www.amazon.com/The-Sensitive-Gourmet-Imaginative-Cooking/dp/0722537131

And there is divine chocolate cake, and more crumbs,

Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

from the Healthy Food Guide http://www.healthyfood.co.nz/recipes/2007/may/gluten-free-chocolate-cake

And, to the cake, I added healthy, blueberry sauce and a helping of not so healthy ice cream.

But ice cream decadence is permissible when the moon is full and round and one is cooking in the night kitchen. Even snakes and dogs are permissible; as long as they are still.

That’s enough nonsense from my night kitchen, except my silliness has reminded me of a wonderful rhyme we loved when we were children :

I went to the animal fair, the birds and the beasts were there. By the light of the moon the giddy baboon was combing his auburn hair. The monkey he gave a jump, and sat on the elephant’s trunk. The elephant sneezed and fell on his knees and what became of the monkey, monkey, monk….

All my recipes tonight are gluten-free and dairy free but definitely not chocolate free.

© silkannthreades

A Grand Plan

Towards the end of last year, I devised a grand plan for 2013. The aim of the plan was to improve my giving to friends and the community.  I am blessed by wonderful friends who bring me all manner of gifts: fruit, jam, soup, stews, casseroles, cakes, curries, chutney, garden produce, magazines, books, clothes and even, one time, a pair of earrings. I like to give in return and I especially like to give baked goods, in particular home-made bread.  I love to make bread. So my grand plan was to make a loaf of bread each day to give away. I made a good start but, after a week, the whole wheat flour and the bread maker machine decided to disagree, and I had so many bread failures that I gave up  trying to feed the neighbourhood. Making a half decent  loaf for my own consumption was barely manageable let alone for anyone else.

But I am nothing, if not a trier, so about ten days ago, I revisited my grand plan and returned to my bread making. Here are the results.Light Rye Bread

More breadDaily Bread

I had  fun with my bread making, and, as I mixed and kneaded and waited for the dough to rise and to bake, I realised that a few lessons had risen out of the process, too; namely, my grand plan was not grand, but grandiose! Of all the bread I made, I was only able to gift two loaves. The rest was needed for my own household.  Making bread every day might be fun but I would need super powers to make enough bread to give away a loaf a day.  More importantly, I gained a new appreciation for the words “Give us this day our daily bread”.

We are so used to thinking of bread as that basic “stuff” that we always expect to buy at the cheapest possible price from the supermarket, that we have, I believe, forgotten the wonderful  creation that bread truly is. We have cheapened bread to such an extent  that we no longer see it as  life-sustaining bounty which is brought to us by the  hard work and effort of many farmers and diverse workers, as well as the skilled hands of artisan bakers and the humble hands of home bakers.

Bread, especially daily bread ( and, dare I say it,  even supermarket bread), is a  valuable, precious gift.  Ideally, it is crafted from the best of natural and man made resources and brought to  the table with a generous serving of love. No wonder it gets top billing in the Lord’s Prayer.

Now, for those of you who are gluten intolerant, I am posting this harvest arrangement as a token acknowledgement of the delights of corn bread and gluten-free bread alternatives 🙂 Harvest

© silkannthreades