Silence ~ an Advent Quest ~ let it be

Late afternoon, lily of the Incas, heavenly bamboo, Nana’s jardinière, memories

facing west, twilight on its way

‘The night is for stillness.
…….

It is night after a long day.
What has been done has been done;
what has not been done has not been done;
let it be.’

Evening Prayer 

from © A New Zealand Prayer Book He Karakia Mihinare o Aotearoa 1989 p.185

Advertisements

58 thoughts on “Silence ~ an Advent Quest ~ let it be

    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I hope your day was calm and fruitful. If not, let it be. 🙂 🙂 I started the day with taking washing from the machine, pegging it out, and then realising that the washing had been soaked but not actually washed. Yay! So the early morning wash has only just made its appearance on the line. But, let it be, it will dry before I need it.

      Reply
      1. Art and Soul Space

        You remind me. A couple of days ago, a client made a little cloth book artwork with a stitched, beaded washing line and tiny pegs sewn on. May we each continue to find creative ways with washing lines!

        Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          That sounds so lovely. And, oh yes, there is much creative scope in washing lines (and pegs)! My daughter recently showed me a Kpop video (I no longer remember the title) but it was beautifully done, and a washing line complete with clothes etc was a prominent part of the video.

  1. KerryCan

    Those three words, “Let it be,” are so powerful–why do I forget them and fight against them? Maybe they need to be tattooed somewhere prominent on my body, to remind me . . .

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      LOL; cross-stitched or embroidered are the words you are looking for I think! Although that method would be more painful than a tattoo. 😀 But I agree, they are 3 small words which often get lost in all the other words which crowd our thoughts.

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I am glad to hear you are enjoying my images, ET. I chose the Evening Prayer to read at my father’s funeral. It seemed appropriate but it is also something which can be read on a daily basis.

      Reply
  2. Su Leslie

    I’m not religious, but do find a great deal of wisdom in prayers. I like this very much and shall try to remember it at the close of my often unsatisfying days. Thank you.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Stephanie Dowrick writes of the wisdom of prayers in her book “Heaven on Earth” https://www.allenandunwin.com/browse/books/general-books/self-help-practical/Heaven-on-Earth-Stephanie-Dowrick-9781760111281 I have a copy of her book but haven’t looked at it for a while. It contains prayers and wisdom from many sources, and I find all of them valuable and uplifting. I think the Evening Prayer (not from Heaven on Earth) belongs to that category of universal prayer; it speaks to many and unites many.

      Reply
      1. Su Leslie

        She’s an impressive-sounding woman. I like the notion of universal prayer. I think we all share similar spiritual needs, and one of my issues with religion is how it divides rather than unites.

        Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          Sadly. that happens far too often. Yet, we have Christian prayers, like the one attributed to St Francis of Assisi which specifically ask us to bring union where there is discord. And I am sure other religions call for unity too. What poor listeners we are at times.

        2. Su Leslie

          There is so much goodness and kindness in religions, and I wish people would focus on that instead of searching the texts for teachings they can “use” to justify hatred and evil. Sigh.

  3. thecontentedcrafter

    I love your setting and thoughts yet again – to think this way is to dwell peaceably on the edge of the great silence. In addition, having eavesdropped on your previous conversation, I have for most of my life realised spirituality is not found within organised religion, but is easily seen in the hearts and deeds of those who seek to leave the world a better place for their being here. The prayer is their mantra. Thank you again dear heart.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Thank you for your generous comment. I was brought up within the framework of traditional religion and I enjoyed it; particularly the hymn singing. Things started to fall apart for me, concerning traditional religion, after 5 years of boarding school, where we had to say prayers twice a day and three times on Sunday. Grace was said 6 times a day. I think there was also a weekly religion lesson in the classroom. Some of the religious experiences of those years were genuine and good but mostly I couldn’t wait to get as far away as possible from religion when those 5 years were up. Since those days I have drifted in and out of church and belief. But, much like you, I find what is important to me is being a faithful servant of humanity,of kindness, and of unconditional love, in word, prayer, and deed.

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Thank you, Lavinia. Do they grow in your area? It is lovely to know that we are both enjoying this prayer, ‘you in your small corner and I in mine’. The cats at Salmon Brook Farms are well versed in the let it be lifestyle. 🙂

      Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          Yes, alstromeria. They are grow very exuberantly in my garden but in colder areas they may have to be a green house plant. I am not sure either.

    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Thank you, Laleh. Do you like to have fresh flowers indoors? I am allergic to some flowers so I have to be a bit careful about what I bring indoors.

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      And even for the day after, or the day after that. That is why the suitcase I used in my travels in June is still waiting in the hallway to be stored in the attic. 😀

      Reply
      1. Tish Farrell

        I think we’d all be happier if we remembered to do more praying of this sort. It doesn’t need deity or dogma – just mindfulness of one’s place on the surface of the planet.

        Reply
  4. Liz Gauffreau

    How different the effect of these lines on me from that of their counterparts in the General Confession I grew up with: “We have done those things we ought not to have done, we have left undone those things we ought to have done, and there is no health in us.”

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Dear Liz, I haven’t been in a traditional church setting for almost a decade, and my memories of service details are hazy. I may have said something similar in years gone by and felt some contentment in the ritual of confession rather than the actual words. But this Evening Prayer speaks to my heart. It gives me hope. I expect I am not particularly penitent. 🙂

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Yes, GP, I love the reality of it. I had a good day today with getting things done but most days the undone is far greater than the done. When I was younger I would get very stressed about the undone. It has been hard to teach myself to let go.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.