T.i.c.k. t.o.c.k.

For the first time this year I have slipped in to the zone of a ‘Slow Watch’.

My stay here may only last 24 hours 😉 but I intend to luxuriate in every nano second of it :

doors wide open to gentle breeze, soft sun, and cicada song;

table full- laden with gifts from friends and garden;

Gifts of garden and friends

Gifts from garden and friends

the noisy, bustling,  tilted world  of recent weeks,

Busy

Busy

 

restrained, then replaced by sweet moments

Sweet bites

Sweet bites

of the rightful order of a steady, subtlety silent, tick by tock.

The Rightful Order

The Rightful Order

With thanks to Nath at Beautycalypse for introducing me to the reframing of time via the Slow Watch.

https://beautycalypse.com/2017/02/26/productivity-and-sleep/

 

© silkannthreades

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142 thoughts on “T.i.c.k. t.o.c.k.

  1. Mrs. P

    I had never looked at the link at the end of the post. Very interesting. I found the one habit I need to implement is scheduling only half a day! I also love the hue timer, a gentle reminder to shut down the computer. 😀

    Reply
  2. Sheri de Grom

    I hear you as you speak of moving slow and throwing the windows open. I’ve felt much that way as I’ve released myself from some of my former responsibilities. Your photographs are stunning and lend themselves to the movement of freshness and a lingering of another season to come but a rejoicing of the one you are in now. Beautifully written and photographed.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Thank you, Sheri. It was lovely to hear that you are letting go of some of your former responsibilities. Hopefully you will now have more time to enjoy other activities. There are no windows open here today. We are having a late autumn storm; lots of cold wind and driving rain. I have been having a lazy day though. My biggest activity was making a lemon pudding. 🙂

      Reply
  3. Wendy L. Macdonald

    What a peaceful and restful post for me to sip on before turning off my computer for the night. I also like the suggestion in the link about not overbooking ourselves. It’s especially important for keeping free-time available for creative ventures like flower arranging 😉 and composing blog posts. Coincidentally, I left blank sections in my calendar this week, and my daughter and I have been doing some more girly things together.
    Blessings & goodnight/good morning from Canada ~ Wendy ❤

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      You can tell from my delayed reply that I haven’t been giving enough time to my blogging! Or to myself really. I am taking special note of your blank calendar sections idea. It’s brilliant. Glad you have had some girl time with your daughter, and your Mother’s Day T.I.M.E. out with your children sounded perfect. Blessings. 🙂

      Reply
  4. Marisa @missmarzipan.com

    Fascinated by this slow watch business. Had to check out the link! I have been thinking about time, how I manage it, how I talk about it (or rather my perceived lack of it), procrastination, etc so much recently. I love the simplicity of this lovely post and feel a little more relaxed just stopping by! x

    Reply
      1. Marisa @missmarzipan.com

        I do. I always feel like time in general goes too quickly. And I think it’s something I need to look at and “reframe” as it causes me genuine anxiety at times (the kind that wakes me at 4am). Having said that, at least I know it is an issue. I am trying to incorporate meditation as a daily practice. And I love the calmness in all your posts. I always have x

        Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          I try to keep my days as calm as possible and as free of time constraints as possible, but sometimes there is rush and chaos. I don’t do ‘busy’ as well as I used to, so I expect that’s a sign of ageing. I like the idea of meditation but am hopeless at doing things on a regular basis, although I am very good at sitting in a chair for half the morning, in my pjs, just gazing out the window; that’s far too easy…..perhaps I can call that meditation! 🙂 Sending calming thoughts and hugs.

  5. Aquileana

    The freshness of the fruits and vegetables seem to mix up with that cool breeze you mention. Very nicely penned, dear Gallivanta…. Have a great week ahead! 😀 ❤

    Reply
  6. Pingback: T.i.c.k. t.o.c.k. – Wag 'n Bietjie

  7. Inese Poga Art plus Life

    Fresh produce and slowed down day: that is a very successful combination. It’s nice to read this post and know that you are fine.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Yes, apart from some time consuming house repairs, all is well. Since I wrote my post, autumn has arrived with all its lovely red and golden tones.

      Reply
  8. Born To Organize

    Such a lovely post. I’ve just visited the link you put up for the watch stop. Fascinating! I love the idea of a day slowed down, mindful, slow and filled with fresh fruit, warm days, and windows thrown open to the outdoors. It’s nice to find your post tonight. xo Alys

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      It was so lovely, Alys, but since last Friday we’ve been cozied up to heaters, and watching the rain drip and drizzle ceaselessly. The rain is wonderful but I am already missing the sunshine. Another time piece I would like is a sun dial (tho’ like my solar heating it would be useless much of the time, for lack of sun!). Would you like a sun dial? Maybe you have one already.

      Reply
      1. Born To Organize

        Oh my, rain and drizzle, eh? How quickly the weather changes. I’ve never thought about having a sundial, but that would be an interesting addition to a garden. I’ve seen some gorgeous sundials in park like settings but they’re quite large. I’m sure I could find one smaller.

        Reply
  9. Letizia

    Goodness, those fruits look delicious!

    Slow is good. I’m dealing with health issues which have forced me to live life very slowly. While frustrating at times, it also allows me to see and appreciate things differently and more deeply.

    Have you read “The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating”? I think you might enjoy it.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Phew. I have found your comment. I had managed to make it disappear! I haven’t read the book you mention but I know of it. Gentle reading is wonderful, but sometimes even reading is tiring if one’s health is compromised. I hope your strength and well being improve with the coming spring. Sending lots of hugs, and lots of good vibes from my yummy health giving tomatoes

      Reply
  10. Mél@nie

    welcome back, Lady-G… and btw, may I have some of those gorgeous and yummy fruits and veggies, please-SVP!!! 🙂 thanx-merci d’avance! ❤

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      It looks as though your garden is producing abundantly, too. It’s a wonderful time of year ( hope you have been spared the excessive rain, though.)

      Reply
  11. Tiny

    I am trying (hoping) to slip into that zone after the hustle and bustle of the past two weeks. I wish you a long and comfortable stay there – amid your wonderful table with gifts to enjoy!

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Glad to hear it. 🙂 We have some slow rain today which is great for the garden. Have you done anything about the wristwatch on your blog? My reading suggests its general use really took off about a hundred years ago.

      Reply
  12. Sheila

    I love the peacefulness of this. That’s true that all we need for happiness is a garden (and friends with gardens)! I’m glad you’re enjoying every second.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Sheila, I am so very fortunate to have a small piece of land full of wonderful things. And even more fortunate to have friends who share their garden produce. And there’s always lots to forage in the neighbourhood at this time of year; I have my eye on some grapes!

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Andrea, sitting here having some lovely blog time, but your comment about enjoying the bounty reminds me that I am supposed to be cooking some pears for dessert. Must hop to it. Cooking/stewing pears is a lovely quiet activity, too. 🙂 🙂

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Cynthia, I was starting to think I wouldn’t get even one post out before most of 2017 was over……but I made it. Perhaps eating all those yummy tomatoes gave me essential, inspirational nutrition. 🙂 🙂

      Reply
  13. Su Leslie

    The words “gifts from garden and friends” are magical; they conjure for me the world I want to live in. The world where we grow, appreciate and share the simple necessities of life with each other. I suspect that time in such a world would be inherently slower and kinder.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I suspect you are right. It would be kinder and inherently slower. Recently I was visiting my sister (and parents) in Cairns. Although we had heaps to do, time seemed to be less dominant, and friends seemed to have a wonderful way of taking care of each other. One of the community was in great need, and this is how everyone rallied around…..https://themundanityofitall.wordpress.com/2017/02/09/community-spirit/ Are you tired of the rain yet?

      Reply
      1. Su Leslie

        What a totally wonderful thing to do. I do love that while the “big picture” stuff seems to get scarier and more horrible, everyday life is no less full of goodness and little kindnesses.
        I am very glad the rain is over. We have been remarkably unscathed by it, and are even celebrating a little that our water tank is full and our garden refreshed. But so many people have suffered in floods and landslides. The Big T and I had planned to go away last weekend, to Whitianga. I’m glad the accommodation I booked had free cancellation — though sad for the proprietor.

        Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          I am glad your water tank is full. I am glad you have a water tank. Is that a requirement in your area? (One of my many wishes is to have a water tank.) Even though we have had quite a bit of rain in the region it hasn’t been enough (yet) to break the drought in North Canterbury. 😦

        2. Su Leslie

          I wish it was a requirement that houses had water tanks! Our area was quite rural when we moved here, and had a water tank. It leaked and when we renovated the house, we chose to replace the tank and bury the new one so it didn’t take up lots of lawn. It was an expensive option and we for various reasons we got town supply anyway. We use the tank for the garden mainly, but it’s lovely knowing that we a) have water in an emergency and b) aren’t wasting all the rain that falls on our roof. I’ve been wondering if there would be enough rain to break the drought. Hope you get more rain soon (though perhaps not torrential downpours).

    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Johanna, I usually like to photograph a tidier table, but I couldn’t resist a photo of all the different produce, colours, angles, lines; the bountiful exuberance of it all just made me smile. Fresh salad and apple; one of the best meals ever. I am sure you enjoyed it. 🙂

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Thanks Dianne. A couple of weeks ago I was in Cairns market. It wasn’t serene but the variety of produce was wonderful. So much colour, and so many people who obviously love fruit and vegetables.

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      When the weather is just right it’s the best thing to do; make every moment last as long as possible. Today, we have a complete change ~ an autumnal 10 degrees and lots of very welcome rain.

      Reply
  14. Juliet

    Thank you for sharing your sweet moments Gallivanta. I can feel the slowness, the savouring and the mindfulness in your words and images. May you enjoy more gentle times on the slow watch.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Thank you, Juliet. I haven’t had many gentle times in a while. I realised this weekend how much I had missed them. I loved the huge hibiscus you were holding in your latest video.

      Reply
  15. restlessjo

    Before I ever got to the slow watch concept, I was found extremely wanting in the organisation (or not!) of my day! 😦 I think I may have exceeded my allotted time for reading blogs 😦 Woe is me!
    I hope serenity lingers beyond 24 hours for you, Ann. 🙂

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Jo, miraculously, I still feel serene. 🙂 And, again miraculously, look how much walking, blogging, photographing etc you do in your own disorganised/ organised way. We all need to find the tick tock which works the best for us as individuals.

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I am, I am, Lavinia. In recent months, I have been slow and sluggish and struggling to motivate myself. Being slow and content is an altogether better state to be in. 😀 Hugs to you and the cats. The latter know all about being in the zone of the Slow Watch. They are expert time managers!

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Everything is delicious ( and comes without stomach problems 🙂 ) One day I had tomatoes on toast for breakfast, tomato sandwiches for lunch, and tomato on baguette for supper. Sadly I couldn’t think of a way to have them for dessert!

      Reply
  16. Britt Skrabanek

    I love seeing all of your gorgeous produce! We are SO over winter here. We get a CSA box every week from a farm, and it’s been all potatoes and root veggies for some time. Ready for more variety and sunshine! 😉

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      It will be our potato and root veggie time soon enough. Would you believe we are a bit over kale and other leafy greens? And the garden just keeps on producing the green stuff. 😀 The CSA boxes are a great idea, aren’t they!

      Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          I haven’t tried to grow kale year-round. It will be interesting to see if we can keep it going through the winter. I have managed to keep arugula going year round which is very handy for a quick salad.

    1. Gallivanta Post author

      It’s a beaut, Mrs P. Did you notice how much the bugs are enjoying it too? We have to be particularly careful when we bite into the apples, in case our teeth behead a critter. 😀

      Reply
  17. shoreacres

    I read about the slow watch twice, and still couldn’t make sense of its value. Of course, I haven’t worn a watch since about 1990, so perhaps I’m not a good candidate for such a thing,

    On the other hand, your photos, your words, and the sheer fact of your presence here are a delight. The abundance on your table is a reminder that less is not always more. Sometimes more is what’s needed: more time, more laughter, more love. There’s never too much of those.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I want to cry. I just deleted a long reply to your comment! Let me try again. I find the history of the wrist watch very interesting. https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2015/05/history-wristwatch-apple-watch/391424/ It seems that within the context of the history of time keeping, the wristwatch is no more than a passing fad. When it comes to not wearing time on your wrist, one could say that the weight of history is on your side. I rarely wear a watch now, except occasionally as a piece of jewellery or for sentimental reasons eg today I am wearing my grandmother’s gold watch. My mother hasn’t worn a watch in years. But she does like to have a small clock within easy view. Interestingly, the time management of her meal consumption improved when I gave her an egg timer at meal times (the one which uses sand). Her meals were eaten within the span of the 5 minute timer. So no more whining and complaining and dragging out her meal eating over 30 mins or more. Meals out of the way she had more time for reading, colouring, singing, bird watching and sleeping. 😀

      Reply
      1. shoreacres

        I know just how you feel. I left a long comment on a blog a couple of weeks ago, and WordPress refused to post it. I tried to go back and copy it and repost, but it had gone “poof.” There never is a way to recapture the feel of a first comment, even if we remember the idea of it. So, there we are.

        Still, I appreciate this “new” comment. Like you, I have a couple of sentimental pieces, including my mother’s watch. But I can’t wear jewelry at work because of the danger, and once the habit of not-wearing is established, it simply takes over.

        The meal timer is a genius idea. It’s amazing how such seemingly small tricks can improve life. And what memories that egg timer brings back. Who among the under-thirties (under-forties? fifties?) would imagine that we used to use such to cook eggs? Sometimes I’m astonished to realize in how many ways the world has changed. The good news is, we have some control over our personal worlds. I may look for an old-fashioned egg timer.

        Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          I do hope you find an egg timer. I regret I didn’t buy one for myself. I don’t really need one but the way the timer works is so gentle and soothing, unlike other modern timers I have which beep and buzz, and harass if I don’t attend to them immediately

  18. KerryCan

    The Slow Watch is an interesting twist! I hope, however you’re keeping time, it’s all adding up to a relaxing, meditative, restorative break!

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I love the Slow Watch concept (and look) but these days I hardly ever wear a watch, so I doubt I can justify buying one. 😦 Today was supremely restorative. 🙂

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Give it time! Actually the Slow Watch made me wonder about military and aviation watches. Do you remember if your father had a military watch? Were watches standard issue? It seems as though military watches were very good quality.

      Reply
      1. GP Cox

        Yes, I do remember him him mentioning a watch – and an old stand-by Zippo lighter! He taught me how handy a P-38 opener was – they do come in handy!!

        Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          I was given a wonderful old photo of my great grandmother on board ship for her trip back to Scotland. Can you imagine her excitement to be going home? She arrived in NZ in 1875. I think she travelled back to Scotland nearly half a century later. It must have been a dream come true for her. So I will not give up on my dream!

        2. Liz

          What an amazing story and how fabulous to have that precious photograph. So important to keep hold of our dreams – “the biggest adventure you can take is to live the life of your dreams” ~ Oprah Winfrey 🙂

        3. Gallivanta Post author

          Many of my dreams (little and few as they were) have been mercilessly squashed over the years, but this last weekend was about as close as I have come lately to living the life of my dreams. 😀 😀

    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Yes, this is a bountiful time of year. The tomatoes are from our own garden, and they are full of sunshine and deliciousness. I can’t stop eating them!

      Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          Nath, we have had a friend staying with us for several months. She’s a keen gardener, and I must confess much of the garden bounty is the result of her diligence in the garden.

  19. utesmile

    What wonderful fruits from the earth lovingly arranged with vibrant colours. Is that not a wonderful time to be extra thankful! I can see you making delicious miracles out of it. Enjoy!

    Reply

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