‘ A Wigwam for a Goose’s Bridle’

Some of you will have noticed that I have been peeking round the cyber curtain lately, much like the child who has been sent to bed on the night of the party, but can’t resist peering round the door to see what  the grown ups are doing.

And, like that child, I am enjoying my glimpses into the other room ( of  WordPress ). Am I ready to cast aside the curtain and boldly enter  into your presence?  Not quite.  Not yet. I am still busy gathering up the riches of a lovely warm autumn; storing them away for the winter ahead.

I have also been gathering memories, like this one. In April I spent time with my parents who live in Australia. My mother and I worked on a small art project which involved threads and beads and ribbons and decorative butterflies. When it was finished I held it up, and said to my mother, “It’s very pretty but I have no idea what we have made, or what it is for? What do you think it is for ?” She looked at it, uncertainly, and said, after a moment’s reflection, ” A wigwam for a goose’s bridle.

I laughed. A truer word was never spoken.  (Though I don’t think she meant the saying  in its “mind your own business” sense. It was more that she thought we had made something nonsensical!)

'A wigwam for a goose's bridle' April 2016

‘A wigwam for a goose’s bridle’ April 2016

And with that piece of nonsense, I am going to retire for the night. I love knowing you are just on the other side, with your songs and stories, your words and your wisdom, your photos and fine art, your feelings and foibles, your heart, your smiles.  In the hush of my room I  listen to  the hum of your cyber chatter.   Bliss…….

Goodnight.

 

 

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125 thoughts on “‘ A Wigwam for a Goose’s Bridle’

  1. kirra111

    I love this post Gallivanta. I know this is a post Mum would have loved too. A wig wam for a goose’s bridle – I knew that saying from my Nana – Mum and Nana used it in exactly that way – meaning nonsensical.

    Reply
  2. Sandra

    I am loving your blog and the sentiments behind it. We have those sentiments in common I suspect. But this post in particular caught my eye. The only time I’ve ever heard this phrase is from my partner – yup, he’s a Kiwi! I’m looking forward to following along and seeing more of your beautiful corner of the world 🙂

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Thank you Sandra. Kiwis have some odd expressions, don’t they? I expect you will find a few oddities in Cornwall, too. I have just finished Margaret Forster’s biography of Daphne du Maurier; lots of Cornwall in that!

      Reply
      1. Sandra

        Ha, yes – plenty of oddities here! We are in Du Maurier country; I have passed Ferryside many times. It’s years since I read Forster’s biography; I shall read it again before much longer. Hope you enjoyed it 🙂

        Reply
  3. aleafinspringtime

    I have missed you so! And as with you been peering but not making a plunge into the action! Don’t you think as with all of life, it comes with seasons. Seasons for full days outside in the sun and quiet ones spent in contented silence. How lovely to be able to spend time with your parents. I’ll be heading home to Malaysia for the summer to be with my parents too. I look forward to making nothing or something and laughing about it! 😀 Hugs, Sharon x

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Definitely there are seasons for everything, and we must adjust to them and make the most of each one. I am pleased to know you will be in your Malaysian home soon. I am imagining the hugs and the laughter for you all. 🙂 🙂

      Reply
  4. Britt Skrabanek

    It’s been wonderful seeing you around my WordPress home, Gallivanta! I have been slacking on keeping up with my blogging friends with all of the craziness of life, but I’m hoping to get back on track with that. Hope you’re doing beautifully!

    Reply
  5. Wendy L. Macdonald

    Thank you for sharing your mother/ daughter art woven with love. Me thinks you would be wonderful at writing memoir. You could even have a glossary at the back for colloquialisms–I hadn’t heard of a wigwam for a goose’s bridle before now. 🙂
    Blessings as you enjoy the remainder of autumn ~ Wendy

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Ah Wendy, thank you for your encouragement. A long time ago I wrote short, very short, stories to read to my children at night. In one of our moves, I lost them all. My daughter often asks me to write them again, to tell the stories of our family, but the energy required for memoir writing is enormous. 😦

      Reply
      1. Wendy L. Macdonald

        Yes, it requires enormous energy. When you break it down into a few paragraphs or pages at a time—it’s much more doable. But then comes the rewriting and editing, and it, too, is one bite at a time. 🙂 It’s never too late to start writing a story.

        Reply
        1. Wendy L. Macdonald

          That looks like a good read. And eventually everyone will be able to relate to the topic of aging–if they live long enough. Having a sense of humour is essential during the aging process–I sure don’t want to be a bitter senior citizen. Goofy—yes. 🙂

  6. restlessjo

    You are always good for the soul, Ann 🙂 🙂 What a great expression! I could use it in it’s true sense often 🙂 I know all too well what you mean, and you express it so eloquently and gently. Once sucked back into cyber world…. 🙂 I can feel a relaxed and happy you behind that curtain.

    Reply
  7. Marisa @missmarzipan.com

    Hello! Firstly, although I am not familiar with the saying, I think what you made is really pretty! My crafting sessions with the children often produce little treasures (I literally keep them in their “treasure boxes”) but I am not always sure exactly what it is that we’ve made. If I ask the children the responses are usually quite funny and inventive. I guess that’s just another part of the creative process… the naming of the things we make 🙂 Secondly, how sweet you are to be officially taking it easy around WP but to stop by with your lovely thoughts and comments. You’ve always been so kind!

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Oh dearie me, I found your lovely comment in my spam box. 😦 I don’t often check my spam but I am so glad I did today. How lovely you have treasure boxes for your little ones. Such a great idea. The contents will make you all smile in years to come. I have collections of my children’s work which I still look at from time to time. But it’s probably about time my ‘little’ ones decided what they want to do with them!

      Reply
  8. Karen

    I’m glad that you linked back to the origin of the saying, as I had never heard the expression before. I’m sure your project brought pleasure to you both no matter what it was for. 🙂

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Sometimes it’s fun to look at the origins of certain sayings. Often the origin is as surprising as the saying itself! And, yes, the project was fun.

      Reply
  9. Liz

    This is perfect! I am half-way through Elizabeth Gilbert’s ‘Big Magic’ and one of her key messages is to do creative things just because we like doing them, regardless of the outcome. Your work with your mother is a joyful embodiment of this principle. 🙂 xxx

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Oh that’s good to know, and makes me want to immerse my fingers in paint and do finger painting, just for the sheer fun of it! I’ll let you know if I actually do that!

      Reply
  10. Sheryl

    What a wonderful post! Sometimes it’s fun to do nonsensical activities with loved ones. It’s great to have you peaking around the cyber curtain again. 🙂

    Reply
  11. dtaylor401

    New homes for old memories is such a wonderful idea. To still be having fun with your mother is a trick and a treasure. Good to pick up the thread of your story again.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Diane, you have made me realise how like our lives our little project is; not perfect, sometimes twisted, sometimes nonsensical; but in the end not too bad. 🙂

      Reply
  12. lisadorenfest

    I love your creation and its name (which made me laugh out loud)! Am delighted to see you here even if for but a moment and to know you are well and warm.

    Reply
  13. utesmile

    I saw you peeking, it’s allowed and nice to see you here again. Whatever it is, the wigwam, it looks lovely, the colours and how it is made. Do enjoy the Autumn with sun and the warmth it still has. Wishing you a very good night and I hope our chatter does not keep you awake. 🙂

    Reply
  14. Steve Gingold

    Of course, there doesn’t always have to be a reason for the creation of our art. The pleasure of working together in the completion of a vision was reason enough and hopefully will continue for time to come.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I hope there is more time to come, too, Steve. Some more painting would be fun. And perhaps I could even persuade her to take some photos and put together a collage of them.

      Reply
  15. Tiny

    I think we need to be whimsical at times. It liberating, in particular when it involves beautiful butterflies. Your post made me smile 🙂

    Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          Ah, I know how that goes! It takes me so much effort to get to bed at a reasonable hour. I fail nine times out of 10.

        2. Gallivanta Post author

          It’s been beautiful. We harvested our Jerusalem artichokes today. I will be attempting to cook them for the first time tonight.

        3. clarepooley33

          I love Jerusalem Artichokes. I haven’t seen them for sale for many years and really should grow them. I like the plants themselves and the flowers too but the artichokes are a little fiddly to prepare. Worth it though!

        4. Gallivanta Post author

          🙂 yes, because they are so easy to grow; very useful to have in the garden as long as it doesn’t become invasive.

        5. Gallivanta Post author

          Mine are contained in a raised garden bed so hopefully there’s no danger of invasion. But who knows, I have all sorts of escapees in the most unlikely places in the garden.

        6. clarepooley33

          I know exactly what you mean. Plants do their own thing and often object to the places we want them to live in and find their own more congenial spots.

  16. Clanmother

    I do enjoy your posts. I have been off the grid myself lately visiting family in Edmonton Alberta. You would love Alberta – the bluest skies and a horizon that goes on forever. Have a wonderful day…

    Reply
  17. thecontentedcrafter

    Hello Gallivanta, it’s lovely to see you peeking over the bannister, however briefly. 🙂 We had a discussion about this saying on someone else’s blog post earlier this week – I’d only ever heard it in context of not knowing what the thing was, so was educated in the other meaning.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      It’s strange isn’t it……this distance and this closeness? This real life and this internet life which is somehow very real as well.

      Reply
  18. Letizia

    I love that you and your mother create art together. My mother and I garden together and there’s something lovely about spending that time, sometimes talking sometimes not, creating something.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      We do our best, Letizia! I puzzle my mother enormously with some of the things I ask her to create with me, mostly because I am making things up as I go along. Your gardening together sounds wonderful. My mother and I don’t do that but she loves a wheelchair walk along streets where she can see lots of flowers and trees.

      Reply
  19. womanseyeview

    So nice to ‘hear’ your voice if only for a little intervention. I love that you and your mother created something lovely – just the act of doing it together is quite special. Goodnight to you too.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Yes, just a little intervention. I don’t want to lose touch completely whilst I am busy in other directions. I am hoping to be back with my mother in June when she celebrates her 94th birthday. So between now and then I will have to think up some more projects we can do together. A while back we had her doing some wonderful video messages

      Reply
  20. inavukic

    I say, Gallivanta, I have missed you and thought of and am so glad you spent some time in my alleys Down Under where wig wam you made could fit other’s than just Goose’s taste – very gentle beauty 🙂

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I do enjoy my little trips across the Tasman. I would enjoy them more if airports weren’t involved! Hopefully over the winter I will have more time to blog.

      Reply
  21. shoreacres

    At first, I saw dragonflies rather than butterflies, but that’s no doubt because our dragonflies are flitting. I’d never heard the expression in its original form. Of course, having grown up with wigwams here and there, I took that part quite literally, and was having a hard time putting a bridled goose in with the squaws and chiefs, not to mention the papooses.

    Those little shared projects are such fun. I’ve always smiled to realize that, just as my mother kept my first pieces of awkward, unpolished drawing, I did the same with her last pieces of awkward, unpolished needlework. They help to make the best moments stay.

    It’s lovely to have you here this morning — enjoy your continued memory gathering.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Linda, it is lovely to see my mother so busy with her colouring and various little projects. And, yes, just as she collected our early efforts, we are collecting her late age efforts. They seem very precious. We collect the funny little stories and sayings too. Some we are hearing for the first time. Some come from her early childhood, I am sure. She is taking us back to a time we know nothing about ; giving us another dimension to our family story. Who knows how many other wigwams or goose bridles are hiding in there waiting to be rediscovered. 😉

      Reply
  22. KerryCan

    It’s so good to see you poke your head out and say hello! So, tell me more about the phrase “wigwam for a goose’s bridle”–did your mother just come up with that out of nowhere or is it a colloquialism I’ve never heard? Either way, I love it! And I’ve been meaning to tell you that your photo styling for the vintage items you’ve been selling is beautiful!

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      It’s a colloquialism peculiar to Australasia, so says Wiki. And one that is rarely heard these days. It reminds me of another response I used to get when I asked my grandmother for a story. She would say, “I’ll tell you a story about Jack a Nory and now my story’s begun. I’ll tell you another about Jack and his brother, and now my story’s done.” It’s used to make me a bit cranky but , in the end, I would go off and find my own stories. 😀 I am very happy you like the styling. I am having some small successes with selling but the main thing I want is not money but new and loving homes for these beautiful items. I feel I am achieving my goal.

      Reply

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