Meads and Posies and Life

This post comes to you,

just because it’s spring,

A Spring 'Blue' : for outstanding performance to the sweet peas, hebes, phacelia, borage, forget-me-nots, alyssum, and clematis.

A Spring ‘Blue’ for outstanding performance, to the sweet peas, hebes, phacelia, borage, forget-me-nots, alyssum, campanula, and clematis.

and flowers demand attention, with winning ways,

Clover, sweet peas, and roses have winning ways.

Clover, sweet peas, and roses have seductively winning wiles.

and because I promised Tish Farrell , Writer on the Edge, I would  photograph my mini-meadows when they flowered.

'Oh may I squire you round the meads And pick you posies gay?' A E Housman

‘Oh may I squire you round the meads
And pick you posies gay?’ A E Housman

'Ah, life, what is it but a flower?' A E Housman, A Shropshire Lad

‘Ah, life, what is it but a flower?’ A E Housman, A Shropshire Lad

© silkannthreades

216 thoughts on “Meads and Posies and Life

    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I thought of you today when I walked past a house where the entire garden had been given over to plants. No lawn at all, just a little path here and there, and it looked fabulous.

      Reply
        1. Born To Organize

          Oops…I hit send too soon. It’s funny what catches on, then becomes the norm, without every really thinking it through. Fortunately we’re having a paradigm shift, but I fear that after a couple of years of rain, people will be tempted to revert to their old ways.

    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Lovely to share my garden happiness with you. I met a relative this week for the first time. We share the same great great grandparents. Before we met, she sent me a photo of the house where our great great grandparents lived and where my great grandmother was born. The house still stands. So exciting.

      Reply
  1. Pingback: Book Fangirling Blog Award | Ute smile

  2. Cynthia Reyes

    The pictures of the garden are so fresh and lovely, my friend. But did you really, really have to show up your un-domestic diva friends in such stunning fashion with those two fabulous arrangements? Harumphhhhh….

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Oops! Oops! If I were brave I would post a photo of my messy unmade bed so you could see my life on an un-domestic diva day. Like the one I am having today. 😀

      Reply
  3. Sheryl

    The flowers are lovely. I never would have thought of putting clover in a bouquet (I think of it more as a field crop that is used to make hay), but I really like how it looks.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      It’s fun to try out different combinations in a bouquet or flower arrangement. Have you come across many articles on flower arranging in your 100 year old magazines? I doubt clover would have been in a vase 100 years ago but there may be flowers which were popular then but which are not used so much today.

      Reply
  4. danellajoy

    Beautiful, stunning, sumptuous, vibrant and abundant beauties. Your spring must be just a tad better than here…. As the floral display of nature has not arrived in any such manner.. Fingers crossed for summer to come through. 🙂

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Thank you, Iris. Your name reminds me I haven’t got any irises in my garden but this spring I have seen some beautiful irises in a friend’s garden. I would like some in my garden next year.

      Reply
  5. clarepooley33

    Beautiful post Ann! The flower arrangements are lovely. I wish I could arrange flowers but they never look good once I’ve fiddled about with them which makes me feel guilty for spoiling them. I never pick flowers from my garden unless I am growing sweet peas. Your mini-meadow is a beauty!

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Dear Clare, I have plenty of those fiddled about with flower arrangements, too. But sometimes I manage to get the flowers placed just so. I love it when that happens. 🙂

      Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          You have such an eye for the beauty and detail around you, Clare, I am sure that moment will surprise you one day. 🙂 Are either of your daughters artistic with flowers?

        2. clarepooley33

          Thank-you Ann! I’m afraid neither daughter is good at flower-arranging – at least they haven’t shown any aptitude as yet… there is always time! My mother can’t arrange flowers either!

        3. Gallivanta Post author

          Ah well, I can put a few flowers in a vase but I can’t draw or paint, 😦 , or write a thesis. That’s why it’s fun to be part of a community. We can pool our talents. 🙂

  6. KerryCan

    You really know how to do spring, my friend! Your arrangements are so pretty–I don’t even bother to cut flowers because I can never seem to arrange them into anything! I hope all is well in your world!

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      All is as well as can be, Kerry. I am just slightly more disorganized than usual. That I even managed to get flowers into vases this past week was a miracle!

      Reply
  7. Juliet

    I love blue flowers; they are always so soothing. Thank you Gallivanta, I shall take these beautiful images into my dreams tonight.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      The bees are having a buzz of a time. I have tried recording them but even though they sound so loud to me, the camera and/or mobile phone can’t seem to pick up their song.

      Reply
  8. Tiny

    What a lovely post! I love your flower arrangements, and I’m happy to see these bringing the spring indoors! And even to my office here. Your mini-meadow is a real meadow when measured in beauty and not in square meters 🙂

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Tiny, my favourite places for the flowers to be is in the garden but sometimes I can’t resist bringing them indoors. Happily, in the case of the sweet peas, the more you pick the more the plant flowers. 🙂

      Reply
  9. Clanmother

    It is cold, raining with snow on its way here in Vancouver. Breakfasts are hot oatmeal and there is plenty of afternoon tea to keep us warm. How wonderful it was to come to your place where spring is flowering. I am so glad that we have seasons, for each has their gifts. Every day, every season, every moment is a celebration. Hugs coming your way…

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Even though it is not cold, you can think of us joining you with hot oatmeal. It is our standard breakfast for all seasons. And I am drinking my supper tea as I write. 🙂 Our flowers may bloom at different times but as Britt says, “We are not different. We are alive. Together.”http://brittskrabanek.com/2015/11/15/we-are-not-different-we-are-alive-together/ How wonderful is that!

      Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          Thanks Dannie. The Southern Redneck description bemused me at first but it amused me that Wiki gives Presbyterians the credit for the origin of redneck. Now I am Presbyterian and I live in the South of New Zealand………not sure that makes me a Southern Redneck though! 😉

        2. danniehill

          Since Kiwi’s are the nicest people I’ve had the pleasure to meet– I think you qualify. Although where I come from ‘redneck’ has little to do with religion and more on a way of life.

        3. Gallivanta Post author

          Yikes….I have been offline. Back on again and I see this Kiwi has failed to thank you for your compliment from November. Hope we still qualify for the niceness stakes. 🙂

  10. Kate Johnston

    So beautiful. I love the mini-meadow — just enough to manage without getting overwhelmed.

    Here, we’re gearing up for winter, but autumn has done us a favor on the seacoast and lasted much longer than usual. I’ve been able to put the gardens to bed, and I never have enough time to do that!

    Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          But those Meads, the metal kind, would look a lot nicer decorated with purple flowers, and would perhaps be more peaceable as a result. Flower power and all that. 🙂

  11. scrapydo2.wordpress.com

    Lovely posies. I think own planted and picked flowers are more special than the well arranged shop flowers. Now I also know the name of mead flowers. My daughter in law has them in her flowerbeds and they go for it when in flowers.

    Reply
  12. thecontentedcrafter

    I love the clover flowers in the vase with the rose! I was looking at them and borage flowering on the hillock that held daffodils at the end of winter – the hillock where Siddy runs and sniffs the flowers. And even while admiring the purple and the blue hoped there were no bees lurking within to sting my wee fellow!

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Oh what a wonderful hillock Siddy has to run upon! I can imagine his joyful sniffing. Jack and the bees seem to have a mutual agreement to come within a hair’s breadth of each other; no collisions yet. I hadn’t used clover as a cut flower till this year. It keeps very well. Dandelions are good value in a vase, too. 🙂

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Ute, the sweet peas are intensely fragrant. You would definitely love them. I have just bought a new bed for the guest room…..it’s waiting for visitors. 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I have vases of white sweet peas and white roses today, though the roses are not from my garden. Very refreshing to look at on a hot day. The bees are busy. I don’t know how many species I have. There are supposed to be 13 introduced species and 28 native species in New Zealand. That’s a miniscule number compared to what you have in France.

      Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          In my NZ family it was always a tradition to have freshly shelled peas for Christmas dinner. So the peas had to be planted in time to be ready for Christmas. I have not kept up that tradition. In fact I have only planted one or two lots of peas in the 15 years I have been in this house. And they didn’t do particularly well.

  13. shoreacres

    And there are those “favorite colors” you mentioned when Steve posted his negative of the wood sorrel with its wooden limb. The flowers are beautiful, and I love the thought of your urban meadow. We’re gray, foggy, and damp this morning, so it was a real pleasure to open the page to such clear, shining colors. I think I like the clover best — are the blooms as large as they seem?

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Blues, whites, and splashes of orange are the predominant colours at this time of the year in my garden. The pinks (colour, not the flower) are just beginning. The clover bloom is slightly larger than the US quarter. So, I guess that is large…for clover. 🙂

      Reply
      1. Mary

        Thank you Gallivanta, I really appreciate it. Yes, it is my plan, I’m hoping to begin a few still life’s in December, switch to charcoal drawings for a bit and then begin to paint flowers in January with acrylics and oil pastels. Thanks again and hoping you have a wonderful weekend.

        Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Oh Diane we certainly do need the sweetness of flowers. I like to imagine that if we all had a pocket handkerchief garden, with flowers, half our problems, and those of the world, would disappear.

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Yes, and now they are awakened we are having very dry conditions. I hope I can keep enough moisture on the plants over the next few days. Whatever goes on is sucked up by the dry nor’west wind.

      Reply
        1. lensandpensbysally

          That’s the mammoth issue. People are only aware of their own desires and needs. For those of us who do see, we are working in our large or smaller way to shore the natural world. Planting gardens, especially native plants, is a worthy effort.

  14. colorpencil2014

    Oh my goodness what an abundance of color and happiness here. So beautiful photographed as well. And I just looking out of the window on a frosty morning with bare trees, pretty too. Thank you for sharing, xo Johanna

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Yes, bare trees and frost have their own beauty. Today I needed chilling. It was hot. I enjoyed iced water flavoured with lemon and fresh fruit. Thinking of you enjoying Thanksgiving.

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Although it is barren in your area, I am thinking of you enjoying all the rich colours of the Thanksgiving table this week. Blessings to you at Thanksgiving.

      Reply
  15. Steve Schwartzman

    Happy spring to you as we up here slip further into autumn (though central Texas is still quite mild).

    My father was a fan of A.E. Housman and had a copy of A Shropshire Lad in his large library, so I became acquainted with it while still a teenager.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I have a copy of A Shropshire Lad in my small library but I am not well acquainted with it( the book, not the library). It is a copy which belonged to my elementary school headmaster. About ten years ago it was given to me by his widow, as a keepsake. He was a good man and a good teacher. Each week he would come to our classroom to read to us. I loved those reading times and the books he chose to read to us. Did you keep your father’s copy of A Shropshire Lad?

      Reply
      1. Steve Schwartzman

        When I left my comment I tried to remember what happened to that copy. I believe my sister has it. My father had collected thousands of books, so we could keep only some of them. Due to logistics—she in New York, I in Texas—she ended up holding on to more books that I did. Even so, I ended up driving back from New York to Austin with a car heavily laden with cartons of books.

        Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          And are the books still in their cartons, or did you take them out and arrange them beautifully in alphabetical order? subject order? colour order? My father liked to read (mystery, crime, thrillers) but he didn’t buy books. I do however have two books which he was given; a nursery rhyme book, and a book of poems, ‘Palgrave’s Golden Treasury with Additional Poems’, OUP, 1935.

      2. Steve Schwartzman

        I unpacked all the cartons of books after I got back to Austin. They’re loosely arranged, primarily by subject, with multiple books by the same author together but not alphabetically ordered. I remember that we had “Palgrave’s Golden Treasury” in the family library when I was growing up; I assume my sister has that.

        Eleven years ago we moved to our current house, and one of the reasons we chose it is that it had bookshelves built in to two sides of one room and a section of one wall in the living room (alongside the opposite side of which we added freestanding bookcases).

        Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          I think Palgrave’s was considered a good introduction to a wide range of poetry. I am envious of your bookshelves. When we were looking for a house in Christchurch in 1999, we saw many with fabulous kitchens and expansive media/games rooms, but built in bookshelves, or walls which could take bookshelves were not to be found. So, our books had to be housed in the garage and the attic.:(

      1. lisadorenfest

        It looks like relief is coming for both of us. The winds are due to go southerly this evening. It’s currently a northwesterly which is HOT 🔥 although not as bad as last week

        Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          Lisa, we have had hailstorms and tornadoes as has Sydney. suffered too. Hope you stayed safe and all is well. I was in Cairns when the hailstorms came here. I was surprised to come home to an intact garden.

        2. lisadorenfest

          I am glad to hear your garden survived that crazy storm. HUGE hail here. We were supposed to go sail boat racing but it was cancelled just in time! Managed to remain safely on a dock

    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Thanks GP. Tish’s meadow flowers are beautiful and expansive. Mine is a town meadow and whilst it is lovely it has to exist within a very modest framework. 🙂

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.