Tired

 

I am tired.

Tired :(

Tired ๐Ÿ˜ฆ

Tired from a miserable cold,

but, most of all, tired of the lacklustre thinking which pervadesย  social policies, and by implication economic policies. I am tired of a welfare system which is itself tired and past its use by date, and is plain. just. not. working for the benefit of us all. I am tired of policies which divide us into deserving and undeserving,ย  and which are more concerned about balance sheetsย  than supporting real needs. I am tired of a system which has a built-inย  unemployment rate, andย  which then adversely judges the unfortunate unemployed or unemployable. In that number I count my daughter who is too unwell to work, and my sister who saves the State thousands and thousands of dollars a year by voluntarily caring for our elderly parents. [ Yet, social and economic policies deem themย  both worthy of only a pittance for their living costs and well-being.]

In the US, we have just seen a landmark decision which confirms people are equal in love. Before I die ( let that be a long way off! ), I would LOVE to see that same unconditional, equal LOVEย  extended toย  decisions which confirm we are equal in our right to a basic guaranteed (living) income; which confirm we are equal in our right to be free of the gnawingย  anxiety of how we will pay for the necessaries ofย  life. ( You may say I’m a dreamer… ๐Ÿ˜‰ )

How this can be achieved I am not sure,ย  but one wayย  which is currently being researchedย  is the Basic Income Guarantee. My nephew writes about this concept in his excellent, thought-provokingย  post,ย  Money for Free, http://radicalblues.com/2015/06/27/money-for-free/

His post begins ” Check out this great new documentary on Basic Income (BI) from Dutch current affairs program Backlight. ….The documentary presents a series of vignettes on BI that provide a good sense of whatโ€™s been tried in the past, whatโ€™s being done today and what might be possible in the future.”

And if the idea of BI seems too radical or too preposterous,ย  here’s a little reminder that one of the most important books ofย  the 20th century, To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, was made possible because the authorย  was given a year’s guaranteed income, so she could complete her novel.

Okay, time to stop sniffling about tiredness ; time to sit in the sun and have another cuppa, and re-energise. Oh, but one thing which makes me less tired is knowingย  there are young people in the world who care about achieving justice in our societies.

ยฉ silkannthreades

206 thoughts on “Tired

  1. Carole Ramke

    Please allow another Texan to comment here, as I have two tips to share with this wonderful group.

    First is my belief that there are patriots all over the world who may be able to overcome the corruption that we are all experiencing. One of them is whistleblower Karen Hudes who is trying to return the world’s wealth to the world’s people. You can find her recent videos by searching for her name and youtube. She has a weekly series at 6 pm Eastern on DCTV

    Second, I want to share my tip for avoiding all colds and allergies, which has worked for me since 2004. I learned this from a chemist and the secret is to stop the histamine reaction before congestion sets in. Please search for “howtostopcolds wordpress” to get directions.

    Much love to all, and may we be successful in creating a better world!

    Reply
  2. womanseyeview

    I read this a couple of times over the week before replying… It’s not just about being down because of a cold – it is heartfelt and reflects the reality of the system. And what is so frustrating is that it doesn’t have to be this way – there is enough wealth and ingenuity in the world that all can be provided for if we had the will. Good for your nephew for doing such important work and good for you for speaking from the heart.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Thank you Carol. And thank goodness there are people doing something, or trying to do something. Writing in 1913 about Lambeth, London, Maud Pember Reeves in Round About a Pound a Week comments “The reason why the infants do not get milk is the reason why they do not get good housing or comfortable clothing – it is too expensive.” Fast forward to 2015, NZ, we have newspaper headlines like this Families forgo ‘luxury’ milk as prices rise.” http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/farming/agribusiness/69787453/families-forgo-luxury-milk-as-prices-rise We are, of course, talking about two different countries, but I am sure if I googled enough I could find a similar headline for the UK and other countries. A hundred years of progress? ๐Ÿ˜‰

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      1. womanseyeview

        I think it’s the same everywhere – the gap seems to be widening and government policy seems to be hardening. You’re so right – we seem to be slipping backwards. It’s good to be concerned about this bigger picture but also about those dear to us within it. Hope you and yours are okay.

        Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          I wish I had the fighting spirit of some of the great reformers of our times, like Maria Montesorri or Florence Nightingale…….I’d come out swinging! ๐Ÿ˜€ ๐Ÿ˜€

  3. lostandfoundbooks

    I hope your cold is getting better. And in the greater sense, the being sick & tired of social inequality (I have those days too!), that is a longer project…but thank goodness people are talking about it. We continue to have discussion about it here in Canada…fingers crossed! http://biencanada.ca/

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  4. lensandpensbysally

    Hope that you are feeling better. I agree, agree, agree with your description of the state of your world and the rest of us. The human condition and its behavior continues to be self-absorbed. Until there is a “greater good” mentality in the consciousness, nothing will change. Life has gotten hard for so many, many people. It’s even more difficult to understand why there is little regard for others and their well being. And that’s (as you imply) in all areas of our lives. It’s a sad commentary about our humanity.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Another sad commentary for me this morning Sally. http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/regional/278224/desperate-families-resort-to-boarding
      ‘Head of Community Housing Aotearoa, Scott Figenshow, said thousands of people revealed to also be living in shacks, garages, and cars, were actually working.

      “Of the 4,017 people living in the improvised dwelling or shelter, roofless or rough sleeper, over 2500 of them are working, is this a sign we have a significant number of truly working poor, who still can not afford decent, safe accommodation,” he said.’

      This news was preceded by the news that our Govt has recorded a surplus of $1.176 billion in the 11 months to the end of May.

      To that I would say, no government is in true surplus if a portion of its people are inadequately cared for.

      Reply
  5. Aquileana

    I second your statements and hope that your wishes, which I share may also become true in my country!… Things are much alike despite the differences. Politics are overall similar, you know… By the way, the second paragraph speaks for itself. A thought provoking post. Thanks dear Gallivanta. All my best wishes. Aquileana โญ

    Reply
  6. melissabluefineart

    This is very interesting. I read that Warren Buffet, for example, wasn’t in it for the money. He simply enjoyed the game, and it happened that the game he played rewarded him with extraordinary amounts of money. When I read that I thought, wouldn’t it be great if what other people do was also “worth” money. Or if money could somehow become irrelevant. I also have an illness that prevents me from working and have been appalled at the judgement I face. I had an acquaintance from the Netherlands who told me that there, artists are considered important and who receive a basic income and health care (I believe?). They only are required to show that they are continuing to produce work, which of course an artist cannot help but do. What a novel idea. And how many people stay in jobs they hate, ignoring dreams, because of the ridiculous cost of healthcare? How sad that is.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I am so sorry to hear you have been judged because of your illness, Melissa. Such judgements are beyond appalling. Everyone, whether in paid or unpaid work, ill or well, needs compassion and support and equality in dignity and worth. Our societies can only be rich and satisfying if they are inclusive. You make my day richer with your blog and beautiful art.

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      My cold is barely noticeable now but I am still tired it seems. Put on parritch, sat down to do a crossword, fell asleep over it, woke up to burned porridge in the pot and porridge all over the element. Yay, GO ME. Dreamy Debussy greatly appreciated. to soothe the day’s escapades. ๐Ÿ˜€

      Reply
  7. Juliet

    Gallivanta, wishing you renewed energy. Being sick depletes not only the body but the mind. May you find comfort and hope again as you recover.

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  8. Kate Johnston

    I know what you mean. My mother is in poor health, but is able to pay for private caregiving in her home. When she complains about losing her independence, I want to shake her. How lucky she is that she can actually afford to pay for healthcare, keep her house, and maintain a comfortable lifestyle when there are sooo many elderly people who are struggling. The costs of medication alone for the elderly is outrageous–if they don’t have health insurance they are in major trouble. And that’s saying something, because health insurance isn’t a guarantee that your expenses will be paid.

    The necessities of life for some elderly and poor people become privileges, and that’s not okay.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Your mother is fortunate. ๐Ÿ™‚ And it is certainly not okay that good health care and good care in general should be privileges.

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  9. Mรฉl@nie

    come over, then! ๐Ÿ™‚ I’m serious…
    * * *
    @”To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee…” – one of my teenage favourite books… and I did watch the movie, of course! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  10. BEAUTYCALYPSE

    I hear you on that. This kind of mental fatigue lurks in the shadows when you read the news and hear politicians talk, an ugly child of frustration and exasperation.
    I will definitely read your nephew’s piece.

    And Jack, too, looks particularly tired. What in this world makes him so said?

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I think Jack was sad because he was fed up waiting for his bone! Or maybe I had told him off for barking. ๐Ÿ˜‰ Most of the time he is free of mental fatigue, and expresses nothing but joy. As with animals, so with humans; properly fed and housed and treated, we tend to be content. ๐Ÿ˜€

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      1. BEAUTYCALYPSE

        Wise words! His kinsman over here is pretty content most of the time also, and only sad if bored. He then sits under some chair and sighs and give us looks that are deeply enigmatic in their blandness.

        A friend of mine said during her latest depressive phase:
        “You know me! I want to change the world, I want a revolution, I want to make people happy, to end wars, to have a reign of justice and fairness… and then I read comments on YouTube and the most philantropic I want then is leave for another planet.” ๐Ÿ˜‰

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        1. Gallivanta Post author

          Ah, yes, that Schnauzer sigh! Nothing equals it. Ha! Your friend is right. And, if you are in doubt about the need to move to another planet, try reading a few online chat sessions….utterly bizarre. But, then, of course, if you take a deep Schnauzer sigh and return to WordPress the world becomes more hopeful. ๐Ÿ˜€

        2. BEAUTYCALYPSE

          I never knew that the signature Schnauzer sigh was a thing! ๐Ÿ˜€
          *needs to make a post about the dog*

        3. Gallivanta Post author

          Please do, please do. Make a post about the dog. Could include sustainable food, sustainable grooming products…… I know that since we took Jack off his vet recommended dog kibble/biscuit he is so much healthier. His coat shines and gleams…no dandruff.

        4. BEAUTYCALYPSE

          Dog food was what made me reconsider whether I trust what *I* am sold in the first place… Will think about a good post!

  11. poetsmith

    Somehow landscapes of mountains does give one an uplifting. Yes, the view and all that surrounds it… magnificent! Keep your spirits up and keep well ๐Ÿ™‚ Love and prayers, Iris

    Reply
  12. Brenda Davis Harsham

    You really struck a nerve with this post. I am tired because my life is too full, too busy, too crazy with a roller coaster of kid-raising emotion. I never get enough sleep and what I get isn’t easy. But I am also carried forward by the tide of love, joy and beauty I see around me, unremarked on by the powers that be. They only want to talk about murder, hatred, terrorism and pain. I remember when the news always had an uplifting component (besides the weather) or a story about a local hero. Why don’t they do that anymore? Heroes are all around us, if we look for them. I prefer to focus on them, because otherwise, fatigue of the soul sets in. I start to despair about our species.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Brenda, it’s hard not to despair, and it’s hard to keep the spirit fresh especially when sleep is lacking. When you mentioned the US victory in the Women’s Soccer, I could feel your spirit soar. Let the wonderful women playing soccer be our good news story for today. And I hope that FIFA’s goal of 45 million women and girls playing soccer by 2019 is well and truly exceeded.

      Reply
  13. Mary Mageau

    Gallivanta, I’m tired too, although I’m not suffering from a cold. Perhaps we are both suffering from ‘Life Fatigue.’ It’s fine to be tired from time to time as we witness the parade of folly from governments, politicians, large corporations, the military industrial complex, etc. etc. How to shake this off? I do so by sitting in the sunshine, out of doors among all of nature’s beauties and focus on what I have to be grateful for. Always this spirits my tiredness away.
    Time will clear all of this as we acknowledge that all of it will pass.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      In the spirit of your sunshine strategy, I have been out to a fruit and vegetable shop which has a fine view of our snow covered mountains. I filled my trolley with mandarins, lemons, oranges, pears, lemonade apples, fresh milk, tamarillos and all the goodies of the season. Feeling much better! The mountain view is spectacular.

      Reply
  14. The Hopeful Herbalist

    Hope you feel better soon. Monitory policies in this country are a bit awry too. I find it so odd that vulnerable people are left to struggle when with support life would be easier for them to cope with. Funny old world she said as Mr Trump’s Sikorsky flies overhead…

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Was it really flying overhead? Does it do so often? Funny world indeed. How we treat our vulnerable people is a measure of our development, in my view. Vulnerable includes our children.

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      1. The Hopeful Herbalist

        Yes our elderly, young, disabled, unwell…. Yea the private helicopter flies over quite often for a while it was right overhead which annoyed me , but seems to be further out to sea now. Odd world wealth and poverty cheek by jowl…. Have a good day!

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        1. Gallivanta Post author

          Thank you Jeni. A good day was had, although my physical tiredness was such that I didn’t wake till the day was half over! 12 hours worth of sleep has got to be good. ๐Ÿ™‚

  15. Letizia

    I wish we could find the solutions we’re looking for, right? sigh. When I still lived in France I saw the best and worst of the socialist system and now living in the US I see the best and worst it here. Wish I could take the best of both and merge them all, haha! Jack seems to have figured it out, he looks quite comfortable.

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    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Jack has the right idea, completely. (Sssh….he stole the cat’s bed!) Every system has a worst and a best; the hard part is working out what is best for each society. Case in point at the moment is Greece.

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  16. Zambian Lady

    I hear you, Gallivanta. Most of us Zambians are also tired – poor people are voted/appointed to political positions and suddenly they are very rich and yet their salaries are very low. It is tiring to see this happen over and over again. Unfortunately, some voters are not wise with their votes and continue voting for people who have proved themselves corrupt in the past.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I am sure they are tired. It is one thing to be fed up with annoying politics, but quite another to have to deal with annoying as well as corrupt.

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  17. Alexander Lautsyus

    To dream and be optimist are the easiest ways to keep yourself in good mood and condition. Unfortunately, rest of the things that can be done to improve our financial security not easy to achieve.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Robbie, I appreciate your faith. I suppose my parents’ generation expected us to make a better world. I wonder if they feel we did a good job?

      Reply
  18. Julie@frogpondfarm

    Oh I do hope you are feeling better! Politics are so very frustrating .. And yes so much appears to be driven by the balance sheet. I popped on over to your nephew’s site .. What an inspirational young man! And thank you for your kind words on my post ..

    Reply
  19. clarepooley33

    I am so sorry you and your husband have colds. I had a very bad cold during this last winter – the worst in years – and that was probably due to tiredness and anxiety. You need to take care of yourself!
    The BI discussions are really thought-provoking. I have been trying to organize my thoughts into coherent sentences but have not had much luck. It’s probably bedtime! I am so pleased that there are people out there ready to try these things. I have become aware of so much negative feeling everywhere. Selfish people unwilling to share; poor and/or sick people without much hope of anything better happening to them; people too frightened to make a stand for something they feel strongly about in case of reprisals and so on. The weariness you spoke about earlier in these comments is rife everywhere. We must try to encourage the BI lobbyists and anyone else who is trying to make society equal. We are all human beings and all have equal rights to the good things of this world.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Clare, I really thought I was doing quite well looking after myself, so this cold was a big surprise. Maybe subconscious worry about my daughter’s accommodation difficulties has been chipping away at my resilience levels. Who knows; but I do know I am done with colds. I don’t want another. And, yes, people who work at ways to make a more just world need our support. Just caught another piece of news on BBC; this time about the closure of the Independent Living Fund. http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-33261331 How stressful for those who depend on it.

      Reply
      1. clarepooley33

        Yes, I was aware of this. The government are trying to off-load a lot of their responsibilities to the local authorities under the guise of giving local people more choice. They are at the same time cutting funding to these local authorities who can’t cope as it is. The very poor, the disabled, the sick (mentally and physically) and the elderly are the ones who will suffer the most as always.

        Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          Our local authorities are struggling, too. The ones in Christchurch, I mean. Partly that is the result of the earthquake taking out so much of our social housing stock. Nation wide the Government is trying to sell off state/social housing to community service providers.To me that just seems like adding layers and layers of obfuscation to deal with a basic problem.

        2. clarepooley33

          This country started selling off social housing years ago when Thatcher was PM. Such a stupid thing to do. All the better council housing was bought and the councils were left with the less desirable properties. Builders don’t want to build social housing and don’t want to build starter homes either. There are still not enough houses for rent – those that are privately rented are SO expensive! There are not enough hostels for the homeless and more people are becoming homeless because of inability to pay rent. Bed and breakfast hotels are being used and then no-one wants to go on holiday and stay in the same place as homeless families. You might be able to tell by this that I used to be a housing officer with a London Borough!

        3. Gallivanta Post author

          I am very pleased for your sake, you can say ‘used to be’. Being a housing officer must been a difficult job in the past, but, from what I read and hear , such a position these days must be unbearably stressful. How can one help if there are no resources! Recently we had a case in NZ of a child’s death being directly attributable to the sub-standard state house she and her family rented. Yet, whilst the State failed this family, it managed to find $11million to buy a diplomatic residence in New York! I shake my head.

        4. clarepooley33

          My goodness! I find cases like this so sad – they also make me angry. Our country sends aid (as it should) to disaster areas around the world but cannot give help to its own needy. I know some people ‘live off’ the state and couldn’t be bothered to get work but these people are such a tiny proportion of the many who would like to but cannot get work or who cannot make their wages stretch far enough. Our government and parliament in general is made up of very, very rich people who have no conception of what it is like to be poor or unable to get what they want. They have made politics their profession and studied it at (the best) university. They have never been members of the general public. Oh dear, I could go on for ever.

        5. Gallivanta Post author

          Indeed we could go on forever! By happenstance the day after I finished my post I began reading a book called ‘Round About a Pound a Week’ by Maud Pember Reeves. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Round_About_a_Pound_a_Week In the introduction by Polly Toynbee, comparisons are drawn between the social situations found by the Fabian Society in the early 1900s (before the NHS and welfare) and those of today. Toynbee writes, “..inequality has grown steeply since the early 1980s: Britain now has the same distribution of wealth as it had in 1937 – and it’s going backwards. At the present pace of growing inequality, we will return to 1913.” And, as you read how hardworking families managed (didn’t manage!) on a pound a week in 1913, one has to feel desperately worried. Even more worrying is this isn’t just happening in Britain.

        6. clarepooley33

          This is very worrying, especially as many politicians seem to be pretending it isn’t happening. How on earth does any one make any changes for the better if the people who are suppose to implement the changes don’t think it’s important.

        7. Gallivanta Post author

          Very hard to know how things can be changed….. I am watching the Greek situation closely. In effect, we are watching the Greek people/Govt saying NO to business as usual. We want things to be done differently. We want economic and social justice. The Greek Prime Minister is a brave man but bravery may not win the day.

  20. Tiny

    Oh, your post almost got me going…I’m so with you. I saw the “pittance” here when my son had the accident in 2012 and was unable to work for 9 months. And voluntarily taking care of elderly parents is not recognized for anything much in most countries. The trend overall is clearly towards dismantling “entitlements”, instead of reforming them in a way that would provide some equality or basic income. But that is what it is, and I hope the younger generation will grow up more generous and caring. I’ll drink an evening cuppa with you on that ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I hope they will, too, Tiny. On the whole, I think most of us are caring, but some of us just go the wrong way about it, or think we are going the right about it but become captive to the law of unintended consequences. That’s why if changes are to be made, they must be carefully thought out. Dismantling entitlements doesn’t seem to me to be a carefully thought out strategy. ๐Ÿ˜ฆ How much simpler it would be if we were all ospreys. ๐Ÿ˜€

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        1. Gallivanta Post author

          Wasn’t she wonderful? Caught her fish but still testing to see if Papa would help out! So happy she has made the transition to independent living. Would love to see her as a Mother.

  21. diannegray

    I hope you’re feeling better soon. I checked out your nephew’s blog – he’s a very clever man indeed.

    I take care of my parents-in-law but there is no pay because they’re not ‘unwell enough’ (I’m actually glad about this). xxxx

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I am glad your parents-in-law are not unwell enough! Most people take care of family out of love, and are happy to do so. What bothers me is not so much the financial side but the official disregard of the value of this unpaid labour. And then there are things like, the ‘let’s raise the pension age’ brilliance, completely ignoring the fact that carers (unpaid), who may have been caring full time for 10 or 15 years, usually have a shortened lifespan and need a pension at least by 60, and not 70, or whatever age well-heeled bureaucrats and economists decide is best for the budget figures. Okay, there may be official disregard but at least your ABS collects the statistics; that’s a start. ๐Ÿ˜‰ The numbers are mind-boggling. http://www.carersaustralia.com.au/about-carers/statistics/

      Thank you for checking out my nephew’s blog. He is a talented chap, for sure.

      Reply
  22. cindy knoke

    Some Scandinavian countries have good models. Safety nets for everyone that make the whole county prosperous. I loved the pope’s message, about the evilness of unrestrained capitalism. I think the best model of unrestrained capitalism is the United States. We still can’t manage universal health insurance. Lots of conservative Christians think poor people shouldn’t receive medical care and they say Jesus agrees with them. Our country is beset by suicide, bullying, mass shootings by unemployed despondent white males, racially motivated police shootings, one of the highest incarceration rates in the world, serious unemployment. A country where celebrities, sports figures and race car drivers are the most highly paid and admired people. A country of the Kardashians and reality TV. A country dominated by global corporate interests, that pollute the environment, exploit the third world, and continue to increase the concentration of wealth in their hands.
    Now I am tired and am going to hang out with the hummingbirds.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Dear Cindy, I hope the hummingbirds have you happily humming again! It’s hard not to rant, rage and despair when we care deeply about our countries and know they are capable of being so much better. When I was young, I lived in a milieu that was always rather disparaging of America. I don’t know why (perhaps WW2 experiences with US troops?), so when I had a chance to work in the US in my early twenties I was reluctant to accept. America? Who would want to go there? But I am so glad I did. I found extraordinary beauty, generous and wonderful people, and ideas and art and history and innovation beyond anything my tiny little brain had ever imagined. So, for all that is wrong with your country and mine, there’s still a lot right, thank goodness. May your 4th of July be a happy day. And let’s keep ranting and raving and HOPING. By the way, you made me giggle over your typo request. Would you like to know how many typos I actually found? ๐Ÿ˜€

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    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Yes, yes, Ruth, I have and it’s a very exciting development. I would like to see a similar bold initiative here. We need to investigate options.

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  23. jennyredhen

    Do your sister and your parents get everything they are entitled to like home help, extra payments for disabilities, payments for home help, like the lawns, rates discounts etc. the GP should have info about this or Age Concern. I know its much but every bit helps. You probably know about all of this already.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Thanks Jennyredhen. My parents and sister live in Australia. They do access a lot of help, for which we are very grateful, but the main burden of care does fall upon my sister as they live with her.

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  24. jennyredhen

    I know how you feel Gallivanta.. reading the news and hearing about all the extreme right wing social policies that are being enacted everywhere is very depressing.It is so cruel to make the lives of people who are already struggling even harder by not giving them enough to live on All we can do is continue to speak out and be kind to others. It amazes me how many intelligent people vote for these extreme right wingers. Why??

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    1. Gallivanta Post author

      JRH I have been trying to find an excellent TED talk I once listened to which explained why people vote the way they do. Of course, I can’t find it anymore because I can’t remember the speaker’s name. ๐Ÿ˜ฆ And no amount of googling is helping me. Today, the Press showed people in Christchurch reliant on blankets to keep warm because they can’t afford heating. I manage okay now but with increasing rates and costs, will I manage in my older years on a fixed income? It could be a close call. Speaking out and being kind are the best tools we have.

      Reply
  25. Mary

    Hope you are feeling better soon Gallivanta, sorry to read that you are sick again. Yes, I’m tired too ~ too much of everything.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Mary, I seem to be on the mend. Having some sun shining into the house helps chase away the cold/sniffle doldrums. Are you finding some energy to paint?

      Reply
  26. Cynthia Reyes

    Thank God for our young people who step up to the plate when we older ones get tired and a bit disheartened. Kudos to your nephew. I’ve tweeted his post and yours.
    Get over that cold, soon!

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Just about to have another hot lemony drink to comfort the sinuses and the soul. ๐Ÿ™‚ Thank you for the tweets. Would you believe I am not yet a twitterer? And while I am sipping a hot drink I will come and read your latest post. How about that?

      Reply
  27. Tish Farrell

    This is a brilliant video, and just shows that there are creative ways to chip away at the capitalist behemoth. Thank you so much for posting it, and I too wish you renewed cheerfulness and an end to the horrid cold.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      There definitely are ways to transform the behemoth. Perhaps no one way is ideal but the video is a prompt to think about what could be done. After I wrote this post, I noticed a news item on the BBC which dealt with homelessness. I can’t find the BBC report but this Guardian article deals with the same information. http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/jun/24/homelessness-england-families-temporary-accommodation-bed-and-breakfast I could find similar examples for my own city.

      Reply
  28. utesmile

    Sorry to hear you are so down. Unfortunately no government gives everything we need. Is there a perfect system? Every country has different problems and needs and individuals cannot change it. So enjoy your cuppa, and watch South Pacific, such a delightful video and message. Happy Talking!
    I do hope your gloomy days are over and you enjoy better health and happier life!
    Many hugs!

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Ute, I like your suggestion. I am going to listen to the whole of South Pacific and then maybe find a way to watch the movie. Feeling more cheerful already. ๐Ÿ™‚

      Reply
  29. dtaylor401

    Some do lead lives that are more economically precarious than others and are sometimes thought less deserving for that reason. Basic Income is worth trying. Glad to know about Harper Lee. Get better soon. (ever try garlic? one clove chopped fine, on bread, twice a day)

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Diane, I used to devour garlic, as a student, when I had a cold but had forgotten this trick because of the, until now, scarcity of colds in my life. Garlic on bread is back on the menu!

      Reply
  30. colorpencil2014

    Don’t let the Winterblues get the better of you! Indeed celebrate that new law in the USA that let people confirm their love for the law and the rest of the world!! And that dream and contribute to new positive things. There always work to be done, wounds to be healed and new plans to support…we might as well enjoy that! xoxoxox Johanna

    Reply
  31. restlessjo

    We need those young folk to take up the baton, Ann! Politics wearies me to the bone. It needs a lot of youth and vigour to tackle all those wrongs head on! Get well soon, darlin’. I like the sound of sitting in the sun with a cuppa too. Maybe the sun will come out to play after I’ve done Sunday lunch and the ironing ๐Ÿ™‚ ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Jo, although I grizzle and moan about politics and policies, and they make me weary, I am still glad we have them. I wouldn’t like to live in a country without governance. I can’t say the same about colds. What is their purpose? ๐Ÿ˜‰ ๐Ÿ˜‰

      Reply
  32. shoreacres

    I see that La Vagabonde used the word weariness. That’s a word that occurred to me, too. A good night’s sleep often takes care of tiredness, but weariness can be bone-deep, and sometimes takes more than a few-hours’ snooze.

    I hope you’re soon feeling more healthy and refreshed, in body and spirit!

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Linda, you may remember that earlier in the year I was thrilled to learn I had qualified for a week of free respite at a retreat in the North Island. Unfortunately, the retreat had to close suddenly because of lack of funding. I thought I would get by without the respite, so was not too worried, but this cold reminds me that I must still be fundamentally weary. Fortunately I do sleep well, but a weary body (and mind) seems to need more sleep than usual. Thank you for your good wishes.

      Reply
      1. shoreacres

        I’ve been sitting here thinking about times of weariness in my own life. Caring for my mother over the years may have been the most profound experience. I loved her dearly, but she had passive-aggressive tendencies that could exacerbate the situation from time to time.

        Your reflections have brought to mind a song I haven’t thought of in years, but which certainly captures some of our experience with such things: Remember this?

        Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          Linda, I do remember Bridge over Troubled Water. Funny though, with age and experience, I am listening to it with a completely different understanding. Wiki says that the ‘Sail on silver girl’ was in reference to his partner’s discovery of her greying hair. Rather like that.

  33. earthbornliving

    Sending refreshing good wishes from England – I really like the idea of a basic income for all – it looks to a future that invests in the individual instead of asking us all the invest in consumerism …regardless of resources …
    to be able to live in a culture that recognised and celebrated – the creative, inventive, thoughtful and unique would mean the short sighted ness of current policies would get glasses !!!! ๐ŸŒผ

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Perfectly expressed EBL. Investing in the individual is an excellent way to put it. Many Govts probably believe they do this but all I see is welfare trimming and outsourcing of Govt responsibilities, and a numbers game. Also as an art therapist you may have seen how people with mental health difficulties are often condemned to lesser lives simply because of financial limitations. If we don’t strive for some sort of equality amongst individuals, we are as good as putting the frail, the old, the disabled and disadvantaged in poor houses again; just ones without walls.

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      YC comment reminded me of a song I sing from time to time, called Happy Talk, from the musical South Pacific.
      Happy talk, keep talkin’ happy talk,
      Talk about things you’d like to do.
      You got to have a dream,
      If you don’t have a dream,
      How you gonna have a dream come true

      Reply
      1. Steve Schwartzman

        Your link led to some interesting things. Juanita Hall, who played Bloody Mary and who looks so Polynesian, was actually black. The article at

        http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0355765/bio?ref_=nm_ov_bio_sm

        also notes that her singing voice was retained on the Broadway cast album but got dubbed in the movie version.

        France Nuyen, who played Liat in the movie, was half-Vietnamese (and half-French):

        http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0638395/bio?ref_=nm_ov_bio_sm

        Reply
        1. Steve Schwartzman

          From your link I see that the New Zealand tour of South Pacific will begin in Kerikeri, the town where we spent the night before Waitangi Day. Eve’s niece (with whom we stayed on the Whangaparaoa Peninsula north of Auckland) has, since our visit, moved up to that area for the time being.

          Eve arrived in Austin for the first time in January 1988. I believe it was that summer (American summer), on our first visit up to New York so she could meet my family, that my father took us to an outdoor evening performance of South Pacific at Eisenhower Park on Long Island.

          You may not be aware that James A. Michener, the author of the book Tales of the South Pacific that the musical South Pacific was based on, lived the last years of his life in Austin.

        2. Gallivanta Post author

          So South Pacific plays an important role in your memories, too. I think I did know of James Michener’s connection to Austin but not how extensive it was. He was a great philanthropist. Have you read his book Texas? I haven’t. I have read some of his other novels. I remember being fascinated by the detail of his stories.

        3. Steve Schwartzman

          Yes, Michener was a philanthropist. Here’s some information from the website of the Blanton Museum of Art on the campus of the University of Texas: “One well-known acquisition began with the gift in 1968, continuing into the early 1990s, of approximately four hundred twentieth-century American paintings from novelist James Michener and his wife, Mari, for whom the Blanton’s new gallery building is named. The Micheners’ interest in collecting the art of their time and in supporting the work of emerging artists continues to be an important guiding principle for ongoing development of our contemporary collections.”

          Although I’ve lived in Austin for 39 years, I’ve not yet read Michener’s long novel Texas, but when I was a teenager growing up on Long Island I read Michener’s likewise long novel Hawaii, as well as a couple of his shorter novels.

      2. YellowCable

        The video made me smile. I like the old lady saying at the beginning. That was a very well wishing for the young couple. Love the young lady hand movements along the song.

        Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          Aren’t the hand actions lovely! I sing the song a lot but I haven’t watched the movie for a very very long time. I had forgotten the actual scene in which the song is sung.

  34. Steve Schwartzman

    We’re sorry to hear you’re feeling tired and a bit down. Winter probably doesn’t help, so we wish we could send you some of the warmth of our northern summer (and Texas has plenty to spare).

    Has Jewel Kilcher’s (and Patrick Leonard’s) song “Hands” been in your sidebar for some time and I just now noticed it (and listened to it), or did you recently add it as a response to your feelings?

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Oh dear, I wonder where my first response went. Try again. Yes, Hands has been there a while. I do like it, but it was placed on the sidebar in connection with an earlier post. Winter is tough. I don’t usually get colds though. Yet I have had 2 in the past 6 months and my husband has his first cold in about 10 years!
      On the bright side, but mostly in relation to my previous post, here is another connection between Austin and Canterbury. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beatrice_Tinsley

      Reply
      1. Steve Schwartzman

        Your having had two colds in the past six months seems to imply that one of them was shortly before our visit in February (because if both were after that you could have made a more forceful statement about two colds in the past four months). Sorry to hear your husband is afflicted too; we could do without the reminder that misery loves company.

        That is a coincidence about Beatrice Tinsley, who your linked article says lived in both Christchurch and Austin (though her PhD from the University of Texas at Austin preceded my arrival here by 10 years). Too bad she made it only to age 40.

        Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          But the name of Beatrice Tinsley lives on in Austin, according to Wiki. ” The University of Texas at Austin established from endowment in 1989 the Beatrice M. Tinsley Centennial Visiting Professorship, where a distinguished mid career or senior professor is invited to visit for up to a semester.[5] In 2007 they added the Tinsley Scholars, awards for younger researchers to briefly visit Austin.”
          Ha, yes, misery loves company. Am I Misery or Company, I wonder?

  35. KerryCan

    We’ve had such a good week here in the US, with both Supreme Court decisions, that the continuing problems in our country, and the tiredness they engender, are eclipsed for a bit. I hope, when your cold leaves and you get your energy back, you see ways to feel better about your world!

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Yes, the uplifted spirits in the US have been felt here and in Australia. New Zealand already has marriage equality and many Australians are hoping that their turn is next. When landmark decisions are made in a big country like the US, or when the Pope makes a stand on climate change….when things this big happen, I have hope we can take the big leaps of faith which will transform societies.

      Reply
  36. Katrina Lester

    Wenger’s talk was very interesting. I’ll watch the development of the BIG and bot ideas and experiments with great interest. There must be new and better ways of distributing wealth that free people up to lead more fulfilled and creative lives!

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I am sure there must be better ways. I am very curious to see how the Utrecht trial works out, and hopefully others will be courageous enough to experiment as well. I see from the BBC that the latest figures show that the welfare cuts in the UK have not lead to an increase in poverty figures, but that doesn’t take away from the fact that 13 million live in poverty, 2.3 million of whom are children. http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-33275936

      Reply
      1. jennyredhen

        Hopefully the Scots will break away and show the rest of Britain a better way. Those Tories are truly hideous.

        Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          Do you think the Scots may still break away, JRH? Perhaps we should keep that possibility in mind as we decide on the NZ flag issue. We don’t want to be stuck with the Union Jack on our flag if there is no longer a union. ๐Ÿ˜‰

        2. jennyredhen

          I do think the scots will break away eventually.. and then Wales and then Ireland..Those English are just too right wing..

        1. Steve Schwartzman

          I see that you’re in Texas too. After I clicked over to your blog and then looked up the town of Avery on the map, I realized I’d come within a few miles of you when we drove along US 259 on our way back to Austin from the Ozarks in the autumn of 2013. A retroactive hello to you now.

        2. Aggie

          Steve, glad to meet you. Looking forward to following your blog. I am trying to learn the names of the flowers and other plants I see.

        3. Gallivanta Post author

          Aggie, yes, I am in New Zealand, but I suppose my references are all over the place because I feel that countries everywhere share many of the same problems. Hope I haven’t been too confusing.

  37. LaVagabonde

    It’s very difficult to not be weary when you read about politics and world events. It’s a normal reaction, and you’re entitled to feel it.

    Reply
  38. scrapydo2.wordpress.com

    A whole mouth full! It is like that everywhere! Enjoy your cuppa. Wish I could come and join you! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply

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