Tired

 

I am tired.

Tired :(

Tired 😦

Tired from a miserable cold,

but, most of all, tired of the lacklustre thinking which pervades  social policies, and by implication economic policies. I am tired of a welfare system which is itself tired and past its use by date, and is plain. just. not. working for the benefit of us all. I am tired of policies which divide us into deserving and undeserving,  and which are more concerned about balance sheets  than supporting real needs. I am tired of a system which has a built-in  unemployment rate, and  which then adversely judges the unfortunate unemployed or unemployable. In that number I count my daughter who is too unwell to work, and my sister who saves the State thousands and thousands of dollars a year by voluntarily caring for our elderly parents. [ Yet, social and economic policies deem them  both worthy of only a pittance for their living costs and well-being.]

In the US, we have just seen a landmark decision which confirms people are equal in love. Before I die ( let that be a long way off! ), I would LOVE to see that same unconditional, equal LOVE  extended to  decisions which confirm we are equal in our right to a basic guaranteed (living) income; which confirm we are equal in our right to be free of the gnawing  anxiety of how we will pay for the necessaries of  life. ( You may say I’m a dreamer… 😉 )

How this can be achieved I am not sure,  but one way  which is currently being researched  is the Basic Income Guarantee. My nephew writes about this concept in his excellent, thought-provoking  post,  Money for Free, http://radicalblues.com/2015/06/27/money-for-free/

His post begins ” Check out this great new documentary on Basic Income (BI) from Dutch current affairs program Backlight. ….The documentary presents a series of vignettes on BI that provide a good sense of what’s been tried in the past, what’s being done today and what might be possible in the future.”

And if the idea of BI seems too radical or too preposterous,  here’s a little reminder that one of the most important books of  the 20th century, To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, was made possible because the author  was given a year’s guaranteed income, so she could complete her novel.

Okay, time to stop sniffling about tiredness ; time to sit in the sun and have another cuppa, and re-energise. Oh, but one thing which makes me less tired is knowing  there are young people in the world who care about achieving justice in our societies.

© silkannthreades

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205 thoughts on “Tired

  1. Mustang.Koji

    As the politically correct need increases for medicine to keep hearts beating, it conflicts with the body’s life needs: a home, food, family, finances. In other words, the body may continue but it may be hollow without a self-provided sound mind and righteousness.

    Reply
  2. April

    Just when I think another country’s political environment would be better than ours, I see we all have the same type of issues. Recently, the mental health assistance budget was just cut by 25% here. I enjoyed the video and your nephew’s blog post. I could see a guaranteed pay day could make us less stressed and inspire us to give back to the communities we live in. It kind of makes me sick to know that there are people with gross amounts of money and the huge gap between those who have nothing.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      We all seem to have the same problems….Governments so consumed with cutting budgets they forget about cutting edge solutions to difficulties. One of our prisons has been handed over to a private company to run. Supposedly this is efficient. But in fact it is disastrous. Now that the Govt has tried outsourcing its responsibilities to prisoners, ( and thinks it works) they are considering outsourcing their responsibility to mental health patients. I can’t see a happy ending for that idea. How can one turn people’s troubles into a business/ profit making opportunity? Disgraceful.

      Reply
      1. April

        That is disgraceful. How do government officials come up with these ideas? It’s as if they don’t think them all the way through. I find it a bit amusing when our politicians talk about how they are working for our best interests, but I feel it is really for the huge corporations who keep them in office with huge contributions to their campaigns and little honest communications with the public. I feel like a detective when it comes time to vote. One has to sort through a lot of misinformation to understand a person running for office.

        Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          Indeed one does! And unfortunately a lot of people find that task so daunting they don’t bother, and nor do they bother to vote. 😦

        2. April

          That is unfortunate. My kids take that stance. They have become apathetic and don’t allow their voices be heard. It’s not like the politicians will pay attention, but if enough of them gather together maybe they will be heard. It’s better than sitting by while others make decisions for them.

  3. Miss Lou

    Across the ocean, totally feeling what your feeling – with a nice fat dash of helplessness. 😦

    Feel like the world is going crazy. In recent years, which ever party has been in Government, I have always felt like there was a genuine commitment to better our country. Until Now.
    also ;seeing policies which divide us into deserving and undeserving, and which are more concerned about balance sheets than supporting real needs.’ – like kicking our most vulnerable when they are already down on the ground curled up into a ball.

    Eating a cadbury chocolate flake always helps my mood.

    I am going to stack on the weight up until the next election, and goodness help my closet if either of the major parties get voted in.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Sshhh……don’t let on about the chocolate, or it will become something else taken away, to be bestowed only upon the deserving, after the presentation of 6 forms in triplicate.

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      🙂 Lisa, I have somehow managed to go down with a nasty virus so I am afraid it will be a while before I go digging for the Fiji journals I mentioned to you.

      Reply
  4. Boomdeeadda

    My gosh, it’s an epidemic world wide. The cost of living is dragging down so many hard working folks. Living in the centre of our city brings me face to face with homeless individual every day. I’m convinced homelessness is a symptom of the lack of resources available to many suffering mental health issues. If you can’t find a program to support you, you can’t work. If you can’t work, you can’t pay bills. If you can’t pay bills, you end up sleeping outside with everything you own in a shopping cart. It breaks my heart. Then, the reality of being homeless brings with it other disabilitating activities including drugs and alcohol. Hell, I’d drink myself silly if I had to sleep on a sidewalk too. Can you even imagine the lack of self esteem one must suffer when finding themselves in such a deplorable situation. I would hope to see more funding towards supporting the needs of these individuals mental health ‘before’ they become to ill to help themselves. It’s the humane thing for society to do, but is there the will? It’s the first topic of discussion when ever politicians canvas my door for votes. Thank you for addressing the subject. x B

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Boomdee, so sorry for taking such a long time to reply to your comment. I have been struggling with a nasty virus which confined me to bed. So I was tired when I wrote this post and a little while later I was even more tired……not good. I am pleased to hear you tackle politicians on the injustices you see. Even more pleased to hear that your politicians still do door to door canvasing. In my 15 years at this house not one politician has ever knocked on the door!

      Reply
  5. Leya

    I’m glad I’m not an economist…this is difficult and very…well… How to solve these problems? I can understand your worries about your daughter and so on. Take care.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Indeed, the problems are complex. One of the complexities my daughter pointed out to me is this. There is little housing for the vulnerable. When landlords or private entities are asked to be more accepting of ‘differently abled’ tenants, they say, ‘We would like to help but we are a business and not a charity.” Yet Governments in many countries, including New Zealand, are outsourcing their social responsibility as ultimate guardians of the welfare of the people, to the market, to the business model. How can this work successfully for either party?

      Reply
      1. Leya

        It’s about the same here. I don’t know how this will end. Tonight we have a dear guest – a friend of my children’s who had a nasty accident that made this strong young man into a little less strong young man. The consequences were not funny from his employer and now he is home resting and unable to work. If he quits working they say he will get bad referrences and so on. Not easy being young, sick, unemployed a.s.o.

        Reply
  6. Andrea Stephenson

    In Britain, the majority have just voted for a government that wants to keep cutting public services and benefits. I fear that some of the advances that were made years ago to try to give some level of support, like the National Health Service and the welfare state, will soon be gone. I think BI would be a great idea to support people to do more meaningful work for themselves, but I’m pessimistic about the chances of it happening here!

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Yes, it’s hard to be hopeful about creative changes. I see that the UK is about to cut welfare by 12 billion pounds. That’s probably a smallish amount in the context of the whole welfare budget but still…… I also see that unemployment is about 5.4% in the UK and in 2014 the NAIRU was 5% http://www.theguardian.com/society/shortcuts/2014/apr/01/what-does-full-employment-mean-george-osborne-britain. I am not an economist but it would seem to me that unemployment isn’t going to go much lower than it is now. So what happens to the welfare of the 5%, especially if it is harder to get welfare now. And what of the welfare of the underemployed or the fully employed not on a living wage? Oh dear, perhaps I need to be an economist so I can make sense of it all. 😀

      Reply
  7. quarteracrelifestyle

    Gallivanta, I have been the same….all year it seems! Tired. Tired of reading and hearing all that I do and tired of hearing all our governments decisions, statements, policies. This is no longer our beautiful New Zealand, not the country we grew up in and were so proud of. I delivered something to a young woman the other day and she lives in a horrible little street, full of state housing….mostly empty and in a terrible state and we have such a shortage of accommodation here. I couldn’t believe it….I am so sick of it all.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Yes, imagine….I grew up in the era of free education, free University, Bursaries, free dental, a benefit for every child, free milk….. of course, there were flaws even in that system, and there was poverty, but perhaps not so much hopelessness. And people wonder why this http://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/news/70069101/christchurch-14monthold-boy-ihaka-stokes-died-from-extremely-violent-assault happens again and again. #trying not to despair. 🙂 The sun has appeared after bitter cold. Are you warming up?

      Reply
  8. daniellajoe

    totally understand your frustrations with the political systems, the children and seniors should be taken care of…
    p.s. Gallivanta be careful with the laws that just got passed here in the USA, now I read that Switzerland wants to repeal the incest laws…

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      It’s good to be wary of law changes. Sometimes it’s not necessary to change them but simply to do better with the ones we already have. 🙂

      Reply

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