Special for Steve

Steve Schwartzman showed us a bluebell gentian bud, in north-east Austin, Texas, which prompted me to check out our bluebells in Little Hagley Park, today, September 9th. Our bluebells, hyacinthoides non-scripta, or English bluebells, are completely different from Steve’s, but it is fun to compare not only the bluebells but the quality of the photos. Steve’s photos  are, of course, the ones that are infinitely superior to mine. 🙂  But I try, and I did get down on my knees to take some of these photos, so I guess I can say I am attempting to follow in Steve’s kneesteps.

. Across the road in Little Hagley, carpets of bluebells ( Hyacinthoides non-scripta ) bloom where Māori traders camped in the early days of the settlemehttp://resources.ccc.govt.nz/files/CityLeisure/parkswalkways/christchurchbotanicgardens/BotanicGardensWalkingGuide.pdf

‘Across the road in Little Hagley, carpets of bluebells (Hyacinthoides non-scripta) bloom
where Māori traders camped in the early days of the settlement.’ http://resources.ccc.govt.nz/files/CityLeisure/parkswalkways/christchurchbotanicgardens/BotanicGardensWalkingGuide.pdf

 

© silkannthreades

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65 thoughts on “Special for Steve

  1. Just Add Attitude

    I am sorry for the late comment but I had a bug, nothing serious, so I missed out on reading blogs while I recovered. I love bluebells especially when they are massed together under trees, they are such a lovely sight in spring.

    Reply
  2. Sheryl @ Flowery Prose

    Beautiful – and such a sight for sore eyes! We’re coming out of a wicked three-day snowstorm and everything in the garden is buried. There are broken trees lying everywhere in the city – the damage is incredible.

    Reply
  3. Playamart - Zeebra Designs

    i am so glad that you gave this tribute to steve! his daily postings, always beautiful, always showcase some lovely flower as well as the trivia. you definitely gave us an equally-beautiful version – i loved the series as if we first sniffed the individual flower then drifted slowly away before leaving this page!

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Steve’s posts are exceptionally beautiful and informative.I do so enjoy them. I am delighted you noticed the order of the series. It was a good exercise for me to go from the smallest stage I could find to the larger view.

      Reply
  4. Tracy Rhynas

    So pretty…..one of my favourite flowers, and colours. I have fond memories of the bluebells in the woods where I grew up in England. My car is called Bluebell, its a much darker blue, but it was the first thing I thought of when I was asked to name it 🙂

    Reply
  5. shoreacres

    I’m always tickled by the number of people, either not from Texas or not very familiar with our Texas flowers, who call our bluebonnets “bluebells.” The bluebells are as beautiful — no question about that. And from some of the pictures I’ve seen from Europe, they can be fully as dramatic as a field of bluebonnets.

    Of course, the other thing that comes to mind when I hear “Bluebell” is our famous ice cream brand. Here’s one of their cartons filled with bluebonnets. It’s a lovely combination, for sure!

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      So much fun to learn about your ‘Bluebell’ icecream. Would love to try it. I did not know of it when I lived in the US but, then, I was in New York, where it wouldn’t have been easily available. I remember Breyers but I didn’t like it all that much. I do like the combination of the bluebonnets in the Bluebell carton!

      Reply
      1. diannegray

        The moon is magnificent! The mango and lichee flowers are in bloom. But I’m too busy eating all the passion fruit to notice what else is going on around the place! 😀

        Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          Oh Yum, passionfruit. Lichee flowers? Pretty? I have just come from the shops where I saw fresh lichees, a most unusual sight in the fresh produce section. I didn’t dare look at the price. 😀

        2. diannegray

          We had some friends stay from Holland a few years back and they actually camped under the lichee tree because they were so excited about them! They said they would walk a long way to the shops back in Holland to buy tins of lichees when they had them (at a very high price). Now they could just pick fresh ones off the tree whenever they wanted. They thought they were in heaven! lol 😀

  6. thecontentedcrafter

    Isn’t it so lovely to see all the spring flowers out – down here the daffodils are blooming along the roadsides and the parks but I haven’t seen any bluebells anywhere. Your photos are very good I think 🙂

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Perhaps the bluebells are hiding in the woods! At Olveston? Or Lanarch’s castle? Ah, Mr Google suggests Glenfalloch Woodland Garden. I love all three of those places. By the way, my husband’s Kiwisaver funds came through; so fast, so easy. I am still in shock!

      Reply
      1. thecontentedcrafter

        I obviously used the wrong outfit! They still haven’t even acknowledged my application for withdrawal of my funds as yet. The moral? Don’t invest with Mercer!

        I love Glenfalloch – I have never been to Lanarch Castle, the entrance fee always puts me off. There will be some bluebells at the Botanic Garden but I haven’t visited there in a while………. when Mr Mercer sees fit to give me my money I will have a new car and be out and about again 🙂

        Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          The Botanic Gardens in Dunedin are lovely. As for Kiwisaver, I was gobsmacked that it happened so fast. Trouble is, there won’t be much left after all the bills are taken care of. 😦 But, I already have a trusty little old car so that’s okay. Do hope they hurry up with your Kiwisaver.

  7. afrenchgarden

    Your bluebell photographs are really lovely. They are a favourite flower of mine but I have always found them very difficult to photograph and you have managed it from near and far. Amelia

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I am pleased to hear you say that they are tricky to photograph. Blossom is hard to capture, too, I find. Well, with a point and shoot camera, it’s tricky. Or maybe I just go at the wrong time of day. Glad I was able to show you some of your favourite flowers. 🙂

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Indeed it is a daffodil. The bluebells and daffodils are all mixed up together in the park, but depending on which angle you take the photo, you either see lots of bluebells or lots of daffodils, and, just sometimes, you can capture both.

      Reply
  8. Steve Schwartzman

    Thanks, and happy inspiration, Gallivanta. I like the phrase you coined, following in someone’s kneesteps, and I suspect—certainly hope—that the earth in Aotearoa treats your knees more kindly than the often harsh ground in Texas treats mine.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      The earth in Hagley Park was supremely comfortable. If I hadn’t been in my usual rush, I could easily have spent considerable time seated under one of the lovely trees. Of kneesteps….and new words….one of my offspring always said “kneebows” for elbows, which seemed perfectly sensible to me. Elbows, in our house, are now usually referred to as kneebows.

      Reply

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