No words necessary

Spring

 

 

Spring

 

 

Spring

 

 

 

Spring

© silkannthreades

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111 thoughts on “No words necessary

  1. Mrs. P

    The street I lived on as a child was lined on both sides with trees like this. Ours were sour plums that were the size of cherries…of course we tasted them! 😀 Even though they were really sour, we always raced to eat a few when they appeared. But the trees were simply breath taking in the spring…one of the many reasons why Spring is my season!

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      We had some trees like that in neighbouring streets but the trees have all been removed and replaced with magnolias. I suspect people complained about all the messy fruit dropping on the pavement. I always thought the sour plums would be great for jam making or juice making. You remind me how, as kids, we used to love gathering fruit from trees in our area; and we often thought it was more fun if the fruit was sour.

      Reply
  2. shoreacres

    Just so you know… when I wrote about tropical storm Allison and the damage she caused, many of the feelings from that time — loss, grief, anxiety — were back in full force. They didn’t last long, but they were real. No need for guilt over feelings, in my opinion. I love what Martin Luther once said about such things: “We can’t keep the birds from flying around our heads, but we can prevent them from nesting in our hair.”

    And those photos you’ve given us provoked a good bit of emotion for me, too. I’m convinced they’re flowering almond. Ours were planted on the east side of the house, and they were so lush. Every year I would cut branches from them and put them in a little vase in my pink bedroom. I thought they were the most beautiful flowers in the world.

    I just might put off my yearly trip to “somewhere” until springtime, so I can see them again. I’m not sure they grow here in Texas. I need to do some exploring.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I do hope you get to see some flowering almonds. I often feel waves of emotion when bloggers post photos of plants and trees that I knew in my childhood. I spent a lot of time in the garden when I was young. I can remember almost all the trees and where they were. They were my companions.

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Thank you Cynthia. It’s not often you can go to a McDonald’s and be treated to such a lovely sight as you munch on your fries. Let’s have more fast food outlets with beautiful vistas. Oops, but then we might have to slow down which would be bad for business. 😉

      Reply
  3. utesmile

    Beautiful indeed.. no words needed. We have them too and they are the first ones in spring. In Germany we call them “Mandel blüte” which would be translated as Almond blossom… but I don’t know exactly if Almond trees are like that!

    Reply
  4. Lavinia Ross

    I will get some good photos in spring and early summer when the gardens are at their best. We are coming up on the end of a hot summer here heading into autumn soon. I do have a good picture of the lily barrel from earlier I will put in the next post.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I was waiting for you to ask this question!!! The answer is, I don’t know. I was back in this area. https://silkannthreades.wordpress.com/tag/brevet-club/ . The blossom trees are in a vacant piece of land next to a McDonalds. I believe the trees are on old farmland which means they could be fruit trees. However they are also near the old Brevet Club so they could be remnants from the Club gardens. My guess is that the tree in this post is a type of cherry tree, possibly ornamental. I will have to return to see if any fruit develops.

      Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          Mmmm…..that’s a good point. You may have realised that the single flower in the grass is from a different tree than the one featured in the other photos. I am fairly sure that the single flower comes from a peach tree, growing about 6 feet from the mystery tree.

    2. shoreacres

      I think it might be flowering almond: Prunus glandulosa is one variety. It grew in Iowa and Missouri as both a tree and shrub. It always appeared shortly after the forsythia in spring. The blossoms are cherry-like, but many-petaled. They’re about an inch across, as I remember. It’s a beautiful plant, and when I saw the photos, flowering almond was the first thing I thought of.

      Reply
      1. Gallivanta Post author

        You could be right. The image gallery you sent shows the similarities between my blossom and the flowering almond. I wish I had been brave enough to take a branch and have the flowers identified at a local garden centre.

        Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Ephemeral is just the right word. 🙂 By the way, I loved your idea of planting perennials for friends and family who have passed away. Are there any parts of that garden which you would like to show us? I am sure it is very beautiful.

      Reply
  5. Poetsmith

    Absolutely beautiful, the springtime blooms! 🙂 Such a delicate pink and the blue sky a perfect backdrop. 🙂 No more words needed … 😉 Thank you for sharing.

    Reply
      1. Mike Howe

        That’s an interesting question to which I didn’t readily know the answer, so I’ve had a look back at the “catalogue” and the answer, disappointingly, is no. I’ve got tunes for winter, summer and autumn, but no spring…shall have to get to work! I’m glad you liked listening in again yesterday though 🙂

        Reply
      1. pleisbilongtumi

        You are so lucky, my dear friend. My town’s street used to be decorated with flowering trees and it looked so beautiful beautiful when flowering season. It is so funny now, all the way around are shaded by the plain green trees and rubbish !

        Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          Strange indeed. Some of the streets around my area have been replanted with magnolia trees. They are only small now but they have beautiful flowers, all the same.

        2. pleisbilongtumi

          Formerly Lagerstroemia trees were in every city here, the are as beautiful as Magnolias but the trees are larger. thery are flowering trees with variety of colors from light pink to almost red. I really often miss them.

        3. Gallivanta Post author

          What a shame. They are so beautiful. One of my favourite tropical trees is the pink shower tree (cassia). They look magnificent when in flower.

  6. earthbornliving

    Just beautiful – I so loved seeing this as we on the other side of the world head into mists, fruits and Autumn I feel I can turn both ways for the first time and see the blossom and all the possibility in the fruit … 🙂

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Sally at http://lensandpensbysally.wordpress.com/ wrote in her latest post about autumn leaves as the ‘golden coins that bring wealth to the earth’ and about investing in the earth. She also mentioned the upcoming UN Climate Summit in New York this September. Her words were on my mind when I took these photos; how our golden coins of last autumn had brought forth these beautiful blossoms. Also how grateful I am that I can still enjoy the right kind of silent spring. 😀 Mmm…perhaps some words were necessary after all. 😀 😀 😀

      Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          Garden of prayer and hope made think of this great project which is aimed at bringing peace and hope to a vast area of Africa Hope it's not too late. :(

        2. earthbornliving

          I look toward Africa and see crisis and clouds gathering ‘Hope is the thing with feathers-
          That perches on the soul
          And sings the tune without the words
          And never stops -at all –
          Emily Dickinson
          Hope and prayer are so needed right now and it seems also unprecedented medical and humanitarian aid.

  7. ordinarygood

    Stunning, beautiful and a real antidote to the headlines and the politics….thank you. I am about to post my antidote from the glorious day here. Blossom is not in its fulness here yet while our daffodils are in full display….the reverse of your city….mysterious 🙂

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Looking forward to viewing your antidote. It’s been so perfect- spring-wise, today. I want to disappear into the heart of spring and close my ears to the madness of the world.

      Reply

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