One sandwich short of a picnic

In our rush to get out of the house today to enjoy the sunshine, I failed to throw even the most basic of picnic ingredients into the car. Which was a great shame because as we peregrinated (if one can in a car and in one’s own country), we came upon a beautiful picnic spot. Here it is; Ouruhia Domain, a few kilometres north of Christchurch, en route to Kaiapoi.

Ouruhia Domain

Ouruhia Domain

The Domain has playing fields, club rooms, playgrounds, tennis courts, picnic tables, old trees and superb macrocarpa shelter belts.  As well, there is  a serene area of native plantings. The native plants border the Kaputone Stream which is a tributary of the Styx River. I wrote about the Styx River here Source- to-sea.

Now, come wander the Domain with me; first across the bridge and in to the bush;

then back across the Kaputone stream to the fields and courts , so true to the style of the traditional country Domain.

As I was leaving the area of native plants, I noticed a plaque, nestled in the ground under a bush. It stopped me short. It was so unexpected. And it moved me to a small tear to see such a simple, modest tribute to one of New Zealand’s  world-renowned scientists. Here is the plaque. It honours Dr Neil Cherry.

Simple marker for a Scientist

Simple marker for a Scientist

A summary of his work and a little of his life story can be found on this website. 

In many ways, he was a traveller /pilgrim in his fields of interest and research; exploring new ideas and always working for a better world to the very end of his days. I particularly admire his work on behalf of veterans exposed to radioactive fallout from nuclear testing in the Pacific.

More of his life story can be found at  http://www.nzine.co.nz/features/neilcherry_lifestory_part15.html

and the story of his work with Ouruhia is here.

I must say I was glad I only discovered the Ouruhia community’s concerns about electromagnetic radiation when I came home, or we might not have stopped at the picnic spot for so long.

Being without that picnic sandwich, or any sustenance at all, and beginning to feel hungry from our explorations in exciting, unfamiliar territory,  we left the pleasant fields of Ouruhia and continued on to Kaiapoi. There we stopped for a McDonald’s take away before heading homewards. I have a guilty feeling that the take away may have done us more damage than any passing exposure to residual electromagnetic radiation at Ouruhia. Oh well, we had lovely peregrinations. Did you?

© silkannthreades

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44 thoughts on “One sandwich short of a picnic

  1. Pingback: Even a child knows…… | silkannthreades

  2. ordinarygood

    This persistent virus is causing me to be one sandwich short rather too often yet….We have been enjoying the same clear, blue skies and sunshine as you capture here. We did get some much needed garden work done over the weekend. I love visiting areas such as this one you peregrinated about in. Thank you for a virtual trip out and about.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Glad to oblige but I do hope you beat that virus soon. Miserable beast it is. I am often one sandwich short of a picnic, with or without a virus 🙂

      Reply
      1. ordinarygood

        It is the hacking cough and husky throat that is lingering and that is despite the lovely weather. The bright weather does make it easier to potter about. I must go and read your latest post.

        Reply
  3. cindy knoke

    What a noble man! The radioactive fallout issues in the pacific islands is such a horrific tragedy. So incredibly stupid of the scientists and government in my country at the time. This post was a delight! The locale so lovely and the photos exceptional. Kudos my friend~

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Thank you my dear Cindy. Since my visit to Ouruhia the fallout issue in the Pacific has been very much on my mind. A post about it is forming in my mind. The horror of it did, and still does, weigh heavily on me, but your country was not the only one involved. In fact the US has been far more willing than other countries to accept responsibility for the damage caused.

      Reply
  4. utesmile

    You have lots of lovely places to see near you, and it looks pretty empty there. Not many do peregrinate obviously. I love this word, I have never heard it before now. Shame you forgot the sandwiches, they would have certainly be a bit healthier, but as you say, sometimes a Mac Donalds is fun and does not harm. As long as you enjoyed your peregrinating! 🙂

    Reply
      1. utesmile

        I will only take my note pad with me not my laptop, as I want to slow down for that week, but I shall keep an eye on posts on my pad. I have practised a little on it. Also I found out about scheduling, so I will use that. I love my blogging friends so much I can’t do without you!

        In fact I shall be peregrinating today… a walk through “secret” London for 2 hours with a guide. Surely I find some hidden beautiful corners nobody knows about. I will take pictures and nots probably. Might become a post even….

        Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          Now that is something I have to learn; how to schedule. Your tour of secret London sounds so interesting. Tell us more later if you have time 🙂

  5. Clanmother

    What an incredible man!!! And the way you found his resting place was an adventure. When you step out your door, you never know where you will end up or what you will find. 🙂

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Indeed; my adventures usually start with a vague idea/intention which means that I only find out the full story of where I have been when I come home and google. It’s a bit of an odd way of doing things but I like it like that !

      Reply
      1. Clanmother

        I think it is the best way! When you have a specific objective in mind at the start, then it is easier to overlook the opportunities that are in front of us.

        “If you look the right way, you can see that the whole world is a garden.”
        ― Frances Hodgson Burnett, The Secret Garden

        Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Place names are fascinating. Unfortunately I am struggling to find what these ones mean. In the meantime, they can stay as beautiful, lyrical words in my mind.

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      No frizzier than usual! The sun is lovely at this time of the year. Later in the year the UV levels are so high that I tend to avoid being outdoors from 10am to 4pm. In high summer,, if I am outside for more than 10 minutes during peak UV hours, I come indoors again looking as though I have been zapped in a microwave.

      Reply
  6. tiny lessons blog

    Lovely place! Sometimes it is great to explore not too far from one’s neighborhood – there is always something new and wonderful to discover – and I don’t mean McDonald’s 🙂

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      It is an irresistible word. It has all sorts of references which I have yet to explore. And it relates to the peregrine falcon too; an association which makes me smile.

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Yes, maybe I will but I was actually on my way to another location when I was distracted by Ouruhia! So many places to explore. I should keep a picnic lunch always at the ready for these excursions. 🙂

      Reply

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