The Bletting has Begun

Remember the medlars?  A few days ago they looked like this: strange, mostly firm, ugly fruit resembling a cross between an apple and an enormous rosehip.

Medlar, medlar

Medlar, medlar

I wrapped the fruit in brown paper and left it in the cool garage to blett (decompose, rot). Yesterday, I discovered that two of the medlars were  thoroughly bletted and another two were starting to blett. Today, I attempted to photograph the bletting process but with limited success.Time passes If you look closely and carefully, you may be able to see that the fruit on the left is bletted (looking shriveled and dark in colour), and so is the second fruit from the left. The third medlar is starting to blett (on its far surface) and the last medlar (that is the one to the right of the photo) is still unbletted.

Now, isn’t that a lot of blither blather about bletting and bletted and not bletted and unbletting?

For this post, which is as much about  the passage of time as decomposing medlars, I  unwrapped my  grandmother’s aged clock. Since the first big earthquake in 2010, which it miraculously survived, the clock has been tucked away amongst protective clothing in my dresser drawer. Today, I turned the key,  and set the clock  to tick- tick, tick- tick, tick- tick, happily, happily, for the first time in over 2 years. I am enjoying its company again, but I will probably put it away, come evening time.  It is nearly a hundred years old and needs rest and care as much as anyone else of that vintage. It is too fragile now to be left exposed to the rigours of daily life on a table top.

© silkannthreades

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49 thoughts on “The Bletting has Begun

  1. Pingback: Thank You! and Go Me! | silkannthreades

  2. 메간

    Your grandmother’s clock is gorgeous 🙂 I’ve never heard of medlars or bletting, so this was a learning experience for me.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Thank you. I have some gorgeous teapots from my grandmother too. I have been trying to work out how to photograph them because I know you would enjoy those too.

      Reply
  3. utesmile

    You always do your photos so lovely with the leaf, it looks so beautiful, I am sure you aoculd be a designer and design really lovely rooms, with beautiful matching things in it. Those medlars bletted quickly , I assumed it takes longer. I can see the difference. Wonder what miracles you do with them…. watching out for your next posts to show us! xx

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Your words are so encouraging Ute. Generally I think I have a hopeless sense of design and colour, so it is lovely to have your perspective. The medlars are bletting faster than I thought but then I don’t know when they were picked. I am putting on my medlar cooking cap today, so we will see what happens next 🙂

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I would really love to have the clock ticking beside me all the time, as it used to do, but, at the moment, it just seems to precious to leave out in the open. The case is very unusual and seems to be made of some type of plaster of paris. I have taken it to a clock maker to have it appraised but he had never seen anything like it. And, although he admired its unusual and beautiful exterior he said it was not a good quality clock internally. It is a lovely oddity. 🙂

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Thank you. It has been the sort of bleak, wet, cold day where a little silliness with words helps to make up for the lack of warmth and sunshine.

      Reply
  4. Clanmother

    I have been waiting for this post!!! I can’t believe that I am seeing the “bletting process” unfold before my eyes. There is always excitement around your place!! 🙂

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Yes! It’s one step up from watching the paint dry which would be very difficult to do today, anyway, because it’s raining, dare I say it, Vancouver style!

      Reply
  5. melodylowes

    I love your clock – what a special heirloom. I love how you are giving it a rest, onw – time for her to retire and let someone else keep the time! 🙂

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Thank you. I found it so hard to show the dramatic changes in the fruit. I have a little camera and the natural light today is almost absent because of winter rain.

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      The fruit is apparently inedible when it is firm and freshly harvested from the tree. It has to be allowed to rot/blett and become very soft before it is edible and flavourful. This is my first meeting with medlars outside books and cooking programmes so everything about them is strange and new to me. I am sure Dr Seuss would have had huge fun with medlars and bletting!

      Reply
  6. teamgloria

    oh!

    that gorgeous clock……

    sometimes at museums we get as close as possible to vintage clocks just to hear them tick-tick-tock-tick

    beautiful.

    it must have been so scary in that earthquake – as if nothing ever would be safe again….

    *hugs*

    _teamgloria xx

    Reply
  7. silvana1989

    medlars… is the first time I see this fruit either in picture… what are you planning do those fruit? I´m curious!!! would you please describe medlar taste? I don´t think I have chance to try here. wow that is a really old clock… is an antique!! Nice post 🙂

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I am planning to make some jam. This fruit is new to me too. I will be able to tell you in my next post about the taste and hopefully how I prepared it.

      Reply

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