Two seasons in one tree

It looks like autumn. It feels like autumn. It smells like autumn.Looks like Autumn

The evidence seems clear; autumn is here.

Or is it? Take a closer look at this photo of my ornamental cherry tree.Two seasons in One.

Do you see the blossoms?

I used to think that my cherry tree was as confused as I was about changing weather patterns but, a few years ago, I realised that the previous owner of my house had gifted my garden with a Prunus Autumnalis. A Prunus  Autumnalis blooms twice a year; once in autumn/early winter and, again, in spring. The bees and the birds delight in this tree and its blossom. This year, I may ask my little ‘wildlife’ guests if they will let me share their feasting.  Apparently, the cherry leaves and blossoms are as delectable to the human palate as they are to the human eye.

© silkannthreades

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38 thoughts on “Two seasons in one tree

  1. Virginia Duran

    I still don’t get use to being in a different season! I always learn something from your posts, this time about botanics. I find it interesting that the Prunus tree blooms twice per year. Hope you don’t get a lot of rain by the way!

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I learn a lot from your posts too. 🙂 We did have some heavy rain for a day or two, but today is sunny and we have had our first frost on the ground.

      Reply
  2. lensandpensbysally

    Your tree is one of the gifts that Mother Nature bestows. Fortunate for nature’s creatures and you. Nice post–there are not many botanical species that flower twice in a year. Have to research that one.

    Reply
  3. utesmile

    What an amazing tree! Giving us twice a year joy and colour. 🙂 Your nature in NZ is amazing! Keep the photos coming, I love to see what is there, in your garden and elsewhere.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      You are quite right; twice a year joy! Soon the little wax eye birds will be here to enjoy the tree. They are regular visitors in winter. Maybe if I am quick enough with my camera, I will have some nice photos of them to show you.

      Reply
  4. Clanmother

    Whenever I feel tired, sad, disgruntled, annoyed or weary, I find a garden. It doesn’t need to be big, just a corner patch. The healing power of plants is a beautiful mystery. I always come away refreshed.

    Thank you for sharing your garden…

    “When you increase the number of gardens, you increase the number of heavens too!”
    ― Mehmet Murat ildan

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Now there’s a quote that goes straight to my heart. I join in your love of the healing spirit of plants. It also fascinates me that this spirit is often supported by actual healing ingredients in the plants,eg some research suggests that some cherry trees have anti viral properties.

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      And when I published this post I was introduced to other twice blooming plants. It’s fascinating. Apparently there are 100 of these prunus autumnalis trees in the Washington Monument park. I don’t know how common, or otherwise, they are in my city. Nature is full of delightful surprises.

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Oh, I would like that. Lilac is wonderful. It used to be a staple of gardens here but I rarely see it now. I don’t know why it has fallen out of favour with gardeners.

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      It doesn’t produce cherries, unfortunately. It is only ornamental. Wouldn’t that be great if I got fruit twice a year? I used to have a raspberry bush that produced raspberries twice in one season. That was wonderful.

      Reply
  5. teamgloria

    so delicious to have new virtual friends in other seasonal areas – so refreshing to the eye – today in los angeles it is english weather which is Deeply Odd – grey/gray and rainy.

    *wavingtoNZ*!

    Reply
  6. 메간

    Is that what a rose hip is?! Mystery solved. I take rose hip vitamin c tablets, but I never knew what that was. Aren’t you glad to know that I ingest unknown things on a daily basis? 🙂

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Mmmmm….that’s a little scary 🙂 But rose hips are little powerhouses of goodness I am told. I also love rose hip oil; it’s super lovely for your skin.

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I would love to make rose or rose hip jelly but I haven’t ever done so, mostly because of the lack of spray free ingredients. I don’t recall anyone making it in my family.Haven’t tasted it either. We must investigate!

      Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Yes, walking over the autumn leaves is so much fun except when they are all soaking wet like today. I think my favourite season is summer because I like to be warm.

      Reply
  7. valeriedavies

    I too have a tree – a plum that I thought was confused – mine has red leaves, and sharp little plums that are beautiful cooked in wine and spices. It too flowers in autumn and again profusely in spring after which we get the fruit at Christmas. Maybe it’s not confused, but just doing what it was trained to do !!!

    Reply
  8. Tracy Rhynas

    It is autumn here too….the leaves are such a glorious colour this time of year. How nice to have something in your garden that flowers both in autumn and spring 🙂

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      It is lovely. The spring blossoms on the tree are more abundant and beautiful than the autumn ones but I still love to see the autumn blossom. Glad you have some lovely autumn colours too.

      Reply

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