Giving thanks for the RAIN

I am in the middle of writing another post but the rain, which began yesterday, continued all night and is still with us, is so exciting that I have to stop and acknowledge its wonderful presence. I don’t know if this rain is enough to break the drought conditions throughout the country but we, my garden and I, are  thankful for every precious drop of it.

The birds will be grateful too; their bird bath has gone from nil to full overnight. Nearly to the brim

Whilst we humans must collect water in containers if we want to hold on to it, plants are much more inventive. This native New Zealand plant shimmersDroplet Mirror with the thousands of rain drops it captures on its bird nest like structure, interwoven with helpful rain catching cobwebs.PreciousDroppingYou can see how much we needed the rain from this photo taken outside my property last week. DryGrey skies have never been more welcome.Grey is good

Foot note: When a person is granted New Zealand citizenship, and attends the citizenship ceremony, he/she is given a native New Zealand tree/shrub to take home and plant.  In this way, a  new citizen can acknowledge the roots they are putting down in their adopted country. The bushy  plant in my photograph  was given to my daughter when she was granted citizenship. It is drought tolerant but it appreciates, and makes the most of, rain when it comes.

© silkannthreades

Advertisements

43 thoughts on “Giving thanks for the RAIN

  1. Mrs. P

    This is totally off the subject but I had to forward this too you as you are included in the message. I don’t usually go back to threads I’ve read unless I have an ongoing conversation to respond to and figured you probably did the same. Judith found my last post, the tacky one…and left this comment:

    “Hey Soul Sisters, Is there room for another?

    I owe so many people, but especially you two, an apology. You see, I’m fairly new to this blogging thing and I didn’t learn until 2 days ago that the reason I don’t see your posts is that they appear in my reader, not my Inbox, where so many other people I follow end up. I just believed that you didn’t post very often, because I think I used to get yours in my Inbox. Now I know that I have to LOOK at my reader every day. DUH. I learn something new every day.

    I so enjoy your comments on my posts and I love our banter back and forth.”

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Oh I like that comment from Judith. The reader/inbox thing is confusing. I have notifications come to my Inbox but then sometimes I will check the Reader too and find that a post has come to the Reader without the inbox notification. The WordPress system seems to have little problems every now and then.

      Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          Aww thanks. I will finish my games with my sister and a friend and then see how I go. I play via Facebook but my sister uses her iPhone.

  2. cindy knoke

    So happy yu got the needed rain. I know what it is like to wait for it. We are in our second year of draught. So sad to watch. Cheers to you my friend and all the happy plants and animals~

    Reply
  3. Tracy Rhynas

    I had no idea you suffered drought conditions in NZ. I always think of it as being rainy (usually because I am watching South Africa play NZ at rugby, and it always seems to rain on them!). Great story about receiving a native tree/shrub upon citizenship, what a lovely idea.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      We are getting some rain but apparently we have not had enough to break the drought conditions. I think in January a lot of the country would still have looked green. It doesn’t seem to take long without rain for drought to set in.

      Reply
  4. Clanmother

    I give thanks to the rain quite often! Vancouver sits in the middle of a rainforest. Even so, we have experienced drought conditions. Sunshine and Rain are the best of friends!

    Reply
  5. tyler4turtles

    Wonderful post! I am so glad that you finally got the rain you had been waiting for…it looks so very, very dry! It is amazing how plants are adapted to their environments, especially drought tolerant species. I wish new citizens in the USA were given a native tree to plant – of course it would depend on what state they were living – but the idea of making them feel welcome and in touch with the landscape is very admirable. I also read through your other posts, and in addition to being a gifted writer/photographer, you are also a whiz in the kitchen and with arts and crafts! Surrounding yourself with a multitude of hobbies makes the day so much richer and complete…thank you for sharing your passions with us!

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I am glad you enjoyed my posts. I love sharing what I can of our corner of the world and I equally love reading what others say about their experience of the world.

      Reply
  6. lensandpensbysally

    Your post did a covert and overt job of an important point: the use of natives. I volunteer as a backyard steward, and help others design and redesign their properties to include wildlife habitats. Native plantings are essential to return the landscape to its natural state. Glad that you had rain, that precious, precious commodity. In the Mid-Atlantic of the USA (East Coast) we’ve had a snowless winter and lots of rain. Well done post.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Thank you. We have some wonderful native replanting programmes in the city and we are encouraged to include natives in our gardens. A backyard steward sounds fascinating. I am trying to imagine what the property designs look like. Would you be able to share some examples of your work?

      Reply
  7. leapingtracks

    As you say, you don’t need a flood – with the earth so dry, the water won’t be able to soak in if it comes down too quickly. Let’s hope you continue to get fine, delicate steadfast rain which nature can gather up like your pictures show.

    Reply
  8. utesmile

    I am so excited, I have just bought 2 anklets from lizzyrosejewellery, as I realised they are not that expensive and I can pay by paypal. I couldn’t wait for my birthday! It’ll be my Easter treat instead! So happy you had a post about it! Love it … Ute x

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I had forgotten about the possibility of Easter treats. An anklet is better and healthier than a chocolate egg! If you would like to, do tell me which ones you chose so I can imagine our anklets dancing in tandem?

      Reply
        1. Gallivanta Post author

          The red one is so pretty; perfect for spring. You will definitely have the anklets in time for Easter. Now you need sunshine so they can be taken out for a look at the world 🙂

  9. teamgloria

    how glorious a citizenship ceremony to receive roots-to-plant.

    that will stay with us all day as loveliness.

    together with your birdbath.

    we just looked up at the morning skies here in los angeles and heard the birds singing lustily on the power lines – imagining their NZ cousins flittering wings and having a sip in your lovely garden.

    Reply
  10. utesmile

    Glad you got rain and it will revive your green areas hopefully, I could have sent you some form London, we haven’t seen the sun for a while, and it was raining for the weekend. The idea with the tree and planting , putting your roots in, is fantastic, what a nice way to start a citizenship!

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      I would have taken the rain gladly but for now we seem to have enough of our own :). Yes, I think it is lovely to have a tree to plant for a special occasion.

      Reply
  11. ordinarygood

    We have had just over an inch of rainfall in our suburb. I felt quite mesmerized watching it fall here. We are still conserving it and collecting grey water for the garden.
    It was most interesting reading about the native plants that new citizens are given. I did not know that.

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      It is lovely to watch. I wish I had rainwater tanks so I could hold on to some of the rain. I don’t think it is compulsory to give native plants but I think it is a common and widespread practice.

      Reply
  12. melodylowes

    What a great idea to cement citizenship… I’m always in favour of planting something! And rain is a lovely way to keep our world green – in moderation. 🙂

    Reply
    1. Gallivanta Post author

      Not too much please; the last thing our earth needs is a flood. I couldn’t find the link but in one town in New Zealand the new citizens have a park where they can plant their trees. This is an excellent idea because often new New Zealanders will be in rental accommodation when they receive their tree/citizenship.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s